Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) FM 21-20 / TC 3-22.20 Training Info

7-4 Guerilla Exercises

Guerilla Exercises
Guerrilla exercises, which can be used to improve agility, CR endurance, muscular endurance, and to some degree muscular strength, combine individual and partner exercises. These drills require soldiers to change their positions quickly and do various basic skills while moving forward. Figures 7-7 and 7-8 show these exercises.

The instructor decides the duration for each exercise by observing its effect on the soldiers. Depending on how vigorously it is done, each exercise should be continued for 20 to 40 seconds. The group moves in circle formation while doing the exercises. If the platoon exceeds 30 soldiers, concentric circles may be used. A warm-up activity should precede these exercises, and a cool-down should follow them. After the circle is formed, the instructor steps into the center and issues commands.


EXERCISE AND PROGRESSION
Soldiers progress by shortening the quick-time marching periods between exercises and by doing all exercises a second time. This produces an overload that improves fitness.

Many soldiers have not had a chance to do the simple skills involved in guerrilla exercises. However, they can do these exercises easily and quickly in almost any situation.

The preparatory command is always the name of the exercise, and the command of execution is always “March.” The command “Quick time, march” ends each exercise.

For the double guerrilla exercises (in circle formation) involving two soldiers, the commands for pairing are as follows:

– “Platoon halt.”
– “From (soldier is designated), by twos, count off.” (For example: 1- 2, 1-2, 1-2.)
– “Even numbers, move up behind odd numbers.” (Pairs are adjusted according to height and weight.)
– “You are now paired up for double guerrillas.” The command “Change” is given to change the soldiers’ positions.

After the exercises are completed, the instructor halts the soldiers and positions the base soldier or platoon guide by commanding, “Base man (or platoon guide), post.” He then commands “Fall out and fall in on the base man (or platoon guide).”

EXERCISE DESCRIPTIONS
Brief explanations of guerrilla exercises follow.

All-Fours Run
Face downward, supporting the body on the hands and feet. Advance forward as fast as possible by moving the arms and legs forward in a coordinated way.

Bottoms-Up Walk
Take the front-leaning rest position, and move the feet toward the hands in short steps while keeping the knees locked. When the feet are as close to the hands as possible, walk forward on the hands to the front-leaning-rest position.

Crab Walk
Assume a sitting position with the hips off the ground and hands and feet supporting the body’s weight. Walk forward, feet first.

The Engine
Stand with the arms straight and in front of the body. The arms should be parallel to the ground with the palms facing downward. While walking forward, bring the left knee upward to the left elbow. Return to the start position. Continuing to walk forward, touch the right knee to the right elbow. Recover to the start position. Be sure to keep the arms parallel to the ground throughout the entire exercise.

Double Time
Do a double-time run while maintaining the circle formation.

Broad Jump
Jump forward on both feet in a series of broad jumps. Swing the arms vigorously to help with the jumps.

Straddle Run
Run forward, leaping to the right with the left foot and to the left with the right foot.

Hobble Hopping
Hold one foot behind the back with the opposite hand and hop forward. On the command “Change,” grasp the opposite foot with the opposite hand and hop forward.

Two-Man Carry
For two-man carries, soldiers are designated as number one (odd-numbered) and number two (even-numbered). A number-one and number-two soldier work as partners.

Fireman’s Carry
Two soldiers do the carry. On command, number-two soldier bends at the waist, with feet apart in a balanced stance. Number-one soldier moves toward his partner. He places himself by his partner’s left shoulder and bends himself over his partner’s shoulders and back. When in position, number-two soldier, with his left hand, reaches between his partner’s legs and grasps his left wrist. On command, they move forward until the command for changeover. They then change positions. The fireman’s carry can also be done from the other side.

Single-Shoulder Carry
Two soldiers do the carry. On command, number-two soldier bends at the waist with feet apart in a balanced stance. At the same time, number-one soldier moves toward his partner. He places his abdominal area onto his partner’s right or left shoulder and leans over. Number-two soldier puts his arms around the back of his partner’s knees and stands up. On command, they move forward until the command for changeover. They then change positions.

Cross Carry
On command, number-two soldier bends over at the waist. He twists slightly to the left with feet spread apart in a balanced position. At the same time, number-one soldier moves toward his partner’s left side and leans over his partner’s back. Number two soldier, with his left arm, reaches around his partner’s legs. At the same time, he reaches around his partner’s back with his right arm, being careful not to grab his partner’s neck or head. He then stands up straight, holding his partner on his back. On command, they move forward until the command for changeover. They then change positions.

Saddle-back (Piggyback) Carry
On command, number-two soldier bends at the waist and knees with his hand on his knees and his head up. To assume the piggyback position, number- one soldier moves behind his partner, places his hands on his partner’s shoulders, and climbs carefully onto his partner’s hips. As number-one soldier climbs on, number-two soldier grasps his partner’s legs to help support him. Number-one soldier places his arms over his partner’s shoulders and crosses his hands over his partner’s upper chest. They move forward until the command for changeover is given. They then change positions.


Leave a Reply

*

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:

Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!

Other Military Sites