Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) FM 21-20 / TC 3-22.20 Training Info

TC 3-22.20 Chapter 6 – Special Conditioning Programs

Chapter 6

Special Conditioning Programs

“When Soldiers become ill, injured, or have other medical conditions, leaders have the responsibility to recondition these Soldiers and safely return them to duty at an equal or higher physical fitness level.”

COL William R. Rieger, Commandant, U.S. Army Physical Fitness School, 1999 to 2006

AR 350-1 states special conditioning programs are appropriate for Soldiers who have difficulty meeting unit goals or Army standards. These programs are not punitive; their purpose is to improve the physical readiness of Soldiers. Special conditioning programs designed to accommodate these needs will be conducted during normal duty hours. Special conditioning programs include:

  • APFT or unit PRT goal failure.
  • Soldiers on the AWCP.
  • Reconditioning.

APFT OR UNIT PRT GOAL FAILURE

6-1. When Soldiers fail to meet APFT standards or unit goals, leaders should consider many factors that may contribute to these failures, including:

  • Time in training.
  • Regular PRT participation.
  • Prolonged deployment.
  • Recovery from injury, illness or medical condition (physical profile).

TIME IN TRAINING

6-2. The Soldier who is fresh out of IMT may have a level of physical performance below the minimum threshold of his gaining unit. He may be a borderline APFT performer or borderline overweight. Regardless of the situation, he will not be accustomed to the demands placed on the lower extremities during a normal duty day. These Soldiers will face new conditions relating to physical performance such as acclimatization to altitude, temperature, and humidity. It can take up to four weeks to adapt to these unfamiliar conditions. Although Soldiers leave IMT prepared for the transition to the sustaining phase, they may detrain due to leave, transit, and in-processing at their new duty assignments. The same holds true for Soldiers reassigned to different units throughout the Army.

REGULAR PARTICIPATION

6-3. Many factors may influence regular participation in PRT sessions. The most common factors include OPTEMPO and related mission requirements. Leaders must anticipate and plan for these, and must make PRT as important as any other programmed training. In accordance with AR 350-1, Soldiers are required to participate in collective or individual PRT activities at least three times per week. Optimal participation in PRT may be achieved through conducting training sessions anytime during the duty day; not necessarily only in the early morning. Leaders must understand this and make it known. Soldiers should only be excused from regular unit PRT when they have performed exhaustive duties with little or no rest, or have a temporary or permanent physical profile IAW AR 40-501, Standards of Medical Fitness.

6-4. All Soldiers must understand that it is their personal responsibility to achieve and sustain a high level of physical readiness. Many Soldiers are assigned to duty positions that restrict participation in collective unit PRT programs. Commanders must therefore develop leadership environments that encourage and motivate Soldiers to accept individual responsibility for their own physical readiness. Leaders and individual Soldiers need to use the PRT system outlined in this TC to help achieve and sustain high levels of physical readiness.

PROLONGED DEPLOYMENT

6-5. It is well documented that detraining may occur during prolonged deployments. Significant losses in strength, endurance, and mobility occur after a period of 14 days when little or no PRT is conducted. Every effort should be made by leaders to conduct PRT activities as often as mission requirements allow during deployment. Chapter 5, Planning Considerations, provides sample schedules of PRT activities that may be conducted during deployment when both time and space are limited. During post-deployment, when fitness levels may have declined, special considerations must be taken to ensure Soldiers meet or exceed their pre-deployment physical readiness levels. Adequate rest and recovery are especially important to successfully bring Soldiers back to a high level of readiness. Leaders must recognize the amount of time that is required to condition these Soldiers. Furthermore, Soldiers need at least 90 days post-deployment to retrain and prepare for the APFT or unit physical readiness goal.

RECOVERY FROM INJURY, ILLNESS, OR MEDICAL CONDITION

6-6. Soldiers recovering from injury, illness, or other medical conditions must train within the limits of their medical profiles (DA Form 3349 [Physical Profile]) and be afforded a minimum train-up period of twice the length of the profile. Prescribed train-up periods must not exceed 90 days before APFT administration or other unit physical readiness goal requirements IAW AR 350-1.

ARMY WEIGHT CONTROL PROGRAM

6-7. See AR 600-9 for the policy and procedures that apply to screening and enrollment in the AWCP. AR 350-1 specifies that the AWCP will be kept separate and distinct from other special conditioning programs. Soldiers recovering from injury, illness or other medical conditions will be in reconditioning. Soldiers who fail the APFT or other unit physical readiness goals will continue participation in regular PRT sessions with the unit. Soldiers who fail to meet AR 600-9 standards will be enrolled in the AWCP and continue participation in regular unit PRT sessions. They should also participate in additional low impact, caloric expenditure activities.

RECONDITIONING

6-8. Injuries, illness, and other medical conditions impact readiness. Commanders are faced with the daily challenge of controlling injuries in the conduct of rigorous military training. Leaders must be familiar with the factors that influence injury risk. Adherence to the fundamental principles of PRT allows the commander to manage injury risk effectively. When injuries, illness, or other medical conditions limit the Soldier’s ability to participate in PRT, units should offer organized and effective reconditioning programs that expedite his return to unit PRT.

INJURIES

6-9. Injuries are defined as any intentional or unintentional damage to the body resulting from acute or chronic exposure to mechanical, thermal, electrical, or chemical energy, and from the absence of such essentials as heat or oxygen. The information in this section will focus specifically on musculoskeletal (orthopedic) conditions, since they represent the type of injury risk most responsive to sound PRT practices. Among the other conclusions from the DoD Injury Work Group: In the Army alone, musculoskeletal conditions account for over half of all disabilities creating compensation of about $125 million per year. Knee and back injuries constitute a significant proportion of disability and limited duty. Training injuries treated on an outpatient basis and sports injuries may have the biggest impact on readiness.

6-10. According to the Atlas of Injuries in the Armed Forces:

“…injuries pose the single most significant medical impediment to readiness in the military. Not only do injuries impact the strength and ability of our Armed Forces to effectively respond to their mission, they levy staggering annual costs in the hundreds of millions of

dollars against the operating budgets of all the services.”

DoD Injury Surveillance and Prevention Work Group (Injury Work Group)

PREVENTION

6-11. The reconditioning program described in this TC responds to the DoD Injury Work Group recommendation to “…implement programs designed to enhance fitness and reduce training injury rates.” By enhancing the fitness level of Soldiers during the profile and post-profile recovery period, this program is expected to reduce training injury rates. The Army Physical Readiness Training System, shown in Figure 6-1, was developed with Soldier performance and injury control as its two primary objectives. Though these objectives may seem to oppose one another at first glance, the principles of PRT that improve Soldier performance also contribute to reducing injury risk. The DoD Injury Work Group recommends the following measures for injury prevention:

  • Implement programs designed to enhance fitness and reduce training injury rates.
  • Target knee and back injuries for additional efforts toward prevention.
  • Place greater emphasis on prevention of training and sports injuries.

6-12. The Army PRT System shown in Figure 6-1 includes reconditioning as part of the toughening and sustaining phases for Soldiers to facilitate recovery from illness, injury, or other medical conditions. Soldiers in need of recovery should return to unit PRT at a level equal to or higher than their physical state previous to the condition that brought them to reconditioning. Commanders and NCOs must take an active role to control avoidable injuries; however, in spite of every effort to limit injuries in the Army, Soldiers and situations will continue to produce overuse, accidental, and/or traumatic injuries. Keeping this in mind, a plan to bridge the gap between injury and physical readiness is essential. Reconditioning bridges this gap.

“Injuries are not random events; they are the predictable result of a complex set of risk factors, many of which can and should be controlled.”

MG Patrick Scully, Deputy Surgeon General, U.S. Army (1998-2002)

COMMANDER’S ROLE IN INJURY CONTROL

6-13. Precise execution of all PRT activities is essential to the injury control effort. Commanders must allow trained PRT leaders and AIs the time to teach proper execution of PRT activities. PRT leaders and AIs must be able to recognize and offer corrective guidance to Soldiers who are not executing drills to the standards described in this TC. It is especially important for PRT leaders and AIs to maintain the standard since transition from the toughening to the sustaining phase of training depends on execution of the drills to standard,. For example, to control back injuries, postural awareness should be stressed during execution of all drills and

activities. This is evident when the PRT leader or the AI prompts Soldiers to ―set the hips and tighten the abs‖

while performing the exercises.

6-14. Both military and civilian research has shown that reduced running volume is associated with lower injury rates. Accordingly, PRT schedules prescribed in this TC involve less sustained running than is currently performed in Army units. Several studies of military units have shown that reduced running volume does not hinder performance on two-or three-mile run assessments as long as the quality (intensity) of running is maintained.

6-15. In addition to using appropriate PRT schedules, units must also look for conflicts between the PRT schedule and the unit training schedule. By considering the physical demands of tasks on the unit training schedule, PRT leaders are better prepared to plan appropriate PRT sessions. For example, if a 10-km foot march to a range is scheduled for Friday, speed work should not be scheduled for PRT on Thursday. Time should be allotted for leg recovery. Monday and Wednesday’s PRT should not involve CLs 1 and 2 or the strength training circuit if Tuesday’s unit training schedule takes the unit to an obstacle course where upper body strength is heavily challenged,

EXECUTING UNIT RECONDITIONING PROGRAMS

6-16. The following paragraphs assist leaders as they plan and execute a reconditioning program within their units. Army Reserve and National Guard units may tailor this program to meet their specific requirements. The purpose of a reconditioning program is to safely restore a level of physical readiness that enables Soldiers to successfully re-enter unit PRT after injury, illness or other medical condition. A physical profile defines, in writing, limitations to physical activity due to injury, illness or medical condition. The authorized forms for written profiles in the Army are the DD Form 689 and DA Form 3349. DA Form 3349 is better than DD Form

689, because it requires a much more detailed description of the Soldier’s injury and the activities and exercises

that the Soldier can perform with the injury. Soldiers assigned to the reconditioning program include:

  • Soldiers on temporary medical profile.
  • Soldiers in the recovery period after a temporary profile expires.
  • Soldiers on permanent medical profile with specific limitations and special fitness requirements.

Level 1

6-17. To address the needs of Soldiers who are on profile and those recovering from profile, reconditioning employs a two-level system. Level I is a gym-based program designed to maximize the potential of a profiled Soldier while protecting the injured area. Soldiers enter level I once cleared to begin limited activity by the profiling health care provider. Activities in level I include the use of STMs and ETMs. Functional criteria are used to determine whether a Soldier is able to begin reconditioning, at level I or level II.

Example A Soldier with a permanent profile that prohibits sustained or speed running may be assigned to the level I program. This allows him the use of aerobic training equipment on unit endurance and mobility training days.

Level II

6-18. To begin at level II, the profile or recovery reconditioning program, Soldiers must meet the level II reconditioning entry criteria requirements shown in Figure 6-2. Upon entering level II, Soldiers will begin to perform the PRT program. In this level the Soldier is on profile, just off of profile, or cleared to begin level II reconditioning. Preparation will be exactly the same as for unit PRT. The activity may be modified to follow a safe exercise progression. Recovery will be exactly the same as unit PRT.

6-19. Before being discharged from level II and returning to unit PRT, Soldiers must meet the level II exit criteria requirements shown in Figure 6-3.

TOUGHENING PHASE RECONDITIONING

6-20. Rehabilitation and reconditioning programs within IMT are currently conducted at all Army Training Centers as a part of the physical training and rehabilitation program (PTRP). The purpose of the PTRP is to provide physical rehabilitation and physical conditioning for Soldiers who are injured during BCT or OSUT. These programs usually fall under the training command and act independently under the supervision of a physical therapist. Soldiers remain in the PTRP until they are capable of returning to the same phase of BCT/OSUT that they left or as a ―new start‖ at day one of IMT. If an injury is minor and only requires short-term limitations (with minimal impact to training); it may not require assignment to the PTRP.

SUSTAINING PHASE RECONDITIONING

6-21. Reconditioning in the sustaining phase includes AIT and operational units. Consolidation of reconditioning programs at the battalion (or equivalent) level minimizes the administrative and logistical strain on operational unit assets. The brigade surgeon should have medical oversight of the unit reconditioning program. Battalion medical officers are the liaisons between reconditioning program leaders (RPLs) and the brigade surgeon. The first local military treatment facility with rehabilitation services may provide a physical therapist and a physical therapy assistant as consultants to oversee the gym-based reconditioning program level

I. The physical therapist can assist/coordinate training efforts with the RPL.

6-22. The medical platoon leader is the RPL, and the medical platoon sergeant is the assistant RPL or assistant reconditioning program leader (ARPL). If this is not possible, the RPL and the ARPL should be chosen based on the following criteria:

  • Thorough understanding of the Army’s PRT program.
  • Ability to instruct all activities.
  • Understanding of regulations that govern profiling (AR 40-501, Standards of Medical Fitness).
  • Ability to adapt activities to profiled Soldiers.
  • Ability to effectively interact with medical personnel to ensure that Soldiers are fully capable of returning to the unit PRT program.

6-23. It is recommended that each company in the battalion should provide an NCO to assist the RPL on a daily basis. These NCOs should meet criteria mentioned above for the ARPL. In addition, training sessions should be provided on a quarterly basis by the physical therapist and/or physical therapy assistant to ensure proper supervision and optimal safety practices are observed. Trained NCOs will provide supervision and group instruction to Soldiers in the reconditioning program. To meet supervision requirements, at least two NCOs per company should be trained in the conduct and supervision of the reconditioning program.

6-24. Units should ensure adequate space and equipment are provided for the reconditioning program to accommodate STM and ETM drills. The reconditioning program is best executed at the brigade or installation fitness facilities. Because lower extremity injuries prevent many Soldiers from running activities, it is essential to have an adequate number of ETMs that offer cardio-respiratory conditioning while limiting weight-bearing stress to the body. Examples are cycle ergometers, steppers, elliptical machines, rowing machines, and treadmills. Treadmills are full weight bearing machines and are most appropriate for Soldiers cleared by medical personnel to begin a walk-to-run progression. Of these machines, cycle ergometers offer the most body weight support.

6-25. Pool activities such as swimming or deep-water running can eliminate weight-bearing stress. All Soldiers

who are recovering from surgery or have open wounds will receive a physician’s clearance before entering the

swimming pool. Swimming laps, aqua-jogging, and aquatic exercises are excellent ways to maintain or improve cardio-respiratory fitness without putting undue stress on joints and bones. Limitations to one leg or one arm are minimal deficits in a pool environment. Kick board workouts or upper body workouts allow for strenuous activity with minimal risk of re-injury to an affected limb. If staffing is adequate, specialized aquatics programs may be implemented to work on water aerobics or deep-water running programs for non-swimmers. It is important to plan activities that keep everyone active during group pool sessions. Even if a regular pool program is not practical, an occasional trip to the pool may be scheduled to break up the routine and provide cross-training.

6-26. Units that must rely on installation or shared facilities should make arrangements to ensure that space and STM/ETM equipment are available during the time dedicated to the reconditioning program. This may require policies that restrict the use of these facilities to only reconditioning programs. Leaders might need to schedule reconditioning outside typical PRT times such as after 0800 or before 1600 to best achieve dedicated access to gym space and equipment.

COMMAND RESPONSIBILITIES

6-27. The reconditioning program is the battalion commander’s and command sergeant’s major program. A well-run program will assist force reconstitution efforts. The success of the program is dependent on the priority placed on it from the top down. Company commanders and first sergeants must care enough about the program to ensure NCO support.

6-28. The brigade surgeon and battalion medical officers should maintain constant awareness of the program. A medical officer with a background in rehabilitation should act as the installation medical consultant for reconditioning programs. The primary responsibility of the medical consultant is to act as a liaison or advocate for RPLs. The medical consultant should also provide training for the RPLs, ARPLs, and unit reconditioning NCOs. Figure 6-4 shows rehabilitation and reconditioning responsibilities.

6-29. Trainers for the reconditioning program must possess the same knowledge of the program that the RPL have and must have additional education in exercise science. For this reason a physical therapist or a physical therapy assistant is well suited for the role. The following outline should be used when developing training for this program:

    • STM Orientation
      • Equipment familiarization: purpose, technique, safety.
      • Etiquette: observe posted rules, replace all weights and equipment to original positions, and wipe down all surfaces after use.
    • ETM Orientation
      • Equipment familiarization: purpose, technique, safety.
      • Etiquette: observe posted rules, replace equipment to original position, and wipe down all surfaces after use.
    • Reconditioning Session Orientation
      • Preparation: increase heart rate, muscle temperature to prepare the body for more vigorous activity.
      • Activity: provide neural adaptation and improve strength, endurance, and mobility.
      • Recovery: gradually return to resting heart rate (below 100 beats per minute) and bring body safely back to pre-exercise state.
    • Level I (Gym-Based) Reconditioning Objectives
      • Prevent de-conditioning.
      • Work within profile limitations.
      • Restore functional strength, endurance, and mobility.
      • Avoid injury or re-injury.
      • Transition to level II reconditioning.
    • Level II Reconditioning Objectives
      • Progress to pre-injury level of fitness.
      • Avoid injury or re-injury.
      • Transition to unit PRT.

PROFILES AND RECOVERY PERIODS

6-30. Soldiers in the reconditioning program will be on a physical profile or in the authorized recovery period from a temporary profile. Commanders may assign Soldiers with a permanent profile to the reconditioning program or allow them to remain in unit PRT. Soldiers on convalescence leave may be exempted from reconditioning at the discretion of the profiling medical officer. In no case can a Soldier carry a temporary profile that has been extended for more than 12 months without positive action taken to correct the problem or effect other appropriate disposition IAW a military medical review board. Once a profile is lifted, the Soldier must be given twice the time of the temporary profile (but not more than 90 days) to train for the APFT. It is not a requirement to take an APFT after the recovery period if a Soldier is not due to take the semi-annual test. Refer to AR 350-1 and Appendix A of this TC for APFT policy and procedures. The RPL follows the medical guidance on the profile for Soldiers on profile. If there are any questions about the limitations of the profile, the RPL will contact the medical officer for clarification. Once a profile has expired, Soldiers will remain in the reconditioning program until they have met transition criteria to return to unit PRT activities. During this period, the RPL/ARPL, and unit reconditioning NCOs will reinforce the precise execution of PRT activities with each Soldier in small groups or individually. See Figures 6-2 and 6-3 for transition criteria to move from level I to level II or return to unit PRT.

6-31. Soldiers with permanent profiles that do not allow them to meet all reconditioning exit criteria may return to unit PRT once they demonstrate proficiency at all non-profiled activities. For example, a Soldier whose permanent profile only prohibits running would not be in the reconditioning program. Rather, he would do PRT with the unit and perform all activities except running. The Soldier in this example would walk or use ETMs when PRT activities call for sustained or speed running. When a permanent profile is so restrictive that the Soldier is unable to perform several PRT activities, the commander may direct the Soldier to the reconditioning program. This scenario is more likely to occur with Soldiers who are awaiting medical boarding procedures. For less clearly defined cases, the commander can solicit input from the battalion medical officer or brigade surgeon.

EXERCISE PROGRESSION

6-32. Progressing injured Soldiers to a ―return-to-duty‖ level of fitness is the goal of any reconditioning program. There are two possible pitfalls to exercise progression. First, if the exercise progression is too rapid it may aggravate the injury, resulting in a further delay to recovery. Second, if the exercise progression is too slow it risks general deconditioning and a loss of effectiveness when returned to duty. A gap between recovery fitness and unit expectations may also cause undue physical and psychological stress. To assist the RPL/ARPL in decisionmaking regarding exercise progression, the following recommendations are made:

  • Soldiers on profile will have specific limitations as defined by their DD Form 689 or DA Form 3349. These limits will be strictly adhered to.
  • Communication with the profile writer is encouraged if a Soldier is clearly improving faster than written limits allow. There may be a reason that is not obvious for the slow progression. If there is no clear reason to limit the progression, instruct the Soldier to get a new profile that reflects communication with the health care provider. A written request is preferable to relying on the

individual’s memoryfor this.

  • Limitations that are in place for a given injury may not affect other areas. A case of tendonitis in the right shoulder should not affect the ability to do leg presses or ride a stationary cycle. Get a clear understanding from the Soldier of what they can and cannot do. Do not read between the lines of the profile. Once again, contact the profile writer if clarification is needed.
  • Maintain an exercise workout log to track progress of each individual who will require more than two weeks of gym reconditioning. When a profile expires, work with unit leaders to ensure the recovery period is used for reconditioning until the Soldier can meet the criteria to re-enter unit PRT.

LEVEL I RECONDITIONING DRILLS AND ACTIVITIES

6-33. The exercise schedule shown in Table 6-1 provides guidance for conducting level I reconditioning. This schedule of activities will ensure safe reconditioning of Soldiers during the profile period. The physical profile of a medical officer supersedes the following:

  • The RPL briefs the profiled Soldier concerning which exercises are restricted and which they are to perform. The Soldier is also briefed on the use of ETMs (walking and swimming may also be appropriate).
  • As the Soldier improves and profiling limitations are removed, the Soldier may be transitioned into level II of the reconditioning program when transition criteria is met.

Table 6-1. Reconditioning Level I training schedule

MON TUE WED THU FRI
PREPARATION: PD ETM 5 MIN ACTIVITIES: HIP STABILITY DRILL 4 FOR THE CORE ETM 20-30 MIN RECOVERY: RD HOLD EACH STRETCH FOR 20-30 SECONDS PREPARATION: PD ETM 5 MIN ACTIVITIES: HIP STABILITY DRILL 4 FOR THE CORE STM 1 (1-3 SETS@10 REPS) RECOVERY:RD HOLD EACH STRETCH FOR 20-30 SECONDS PREPARATION: PD ETM 5 MIN ACTIVITIES: HIP STABILITY DRILL 4 FOR THE CORE ETM 20-30 MIN RECOVERY: RD HOLD EACH STRETCH FOR 20-30 SECONDS PREPARATION: PD ETM 5 MIN ACTIVITIES HIP STABILITY DRILL 4 FOR THE CORE STM 1 (1-3 SETS@10 REPS) RECOVERY: RD HOLD EACH STRETCH FOR 20-30 SECONDS PREPARATION: PD ETM 5 MIN ACTIVITIES: HIP STABILITY DRILL 4 FOR THE CORE ETM 20-30 MIN RECOVERY: RD HOLD EACH STRETCH FOR 20-30 SECONDS

6-34. Before transition to level II, the RPL/ARPL ensures that the Soldier meets the criteria in Figure 6-2. If the Soldier cannot meet the transition criteria, he should be directed to the medical officer for re-evaluation.

6-35. Before releasing the Soldier back to unit PRT, the RPL/ARPL ensures the Soldier meets the criteria in Figure 6-3. If the Soldier does not meet these criteria before the recovery period ends, the RPL/ARPL will consult with the battalion medical officer to determine a proper disposition.

EQUIPMENT

6-36. When using equipment, endurance training includes four primary variables: exercise mode, training frequency, exercise duration, and training intensity. Exercise prescription specifies training frequency, exercise duration, and training intensity. The mode of exercise (type of equipment) is determined by environmental constraints and training IAW physical profile limitations (temporary/permanent). Each ETM and STM contains specific instructions for proper use and adjustments to obtain optimal posture and technique during exercise (seat position on cycle ergometers, rowing machines, and STMs). If a piece of training equipment has no visible list of operating instructions, the RPL, ARPL, or gym personnel should be consulted for assistance.

EXERCISE MODE

6-37. Exercise mode refers to the specific activity performed by a Soldier: running, cycling, swimming, strength training, and endurance training equipment. Environmental constraints, safety for Soldiers on physical profile, and isolation of specific muscle groups to be trained during rehabilitation and reconditioning are some of the advantages of using STMs and ETMs. Consideration for use of specific types of equipment may be based on a Soldier’s range of movement, limb limitation and/or the ability to participate in weight-bearing or nonweight-bearing activities. Weight-bearing activities include walking or running on a treadmill and climbing on a stair climbing or stepping machine. Non-weight bearing and limited weight-bearing activities include use of cycle ergometers (upright/recumbent), elliptical trainers, rowers, climbing machines, and cross-country ski machines. Use of limited or non-weight-bearing endurance training equipment is desirable for obtaining higher caloric expenditure through additional training sessions by overweight Soldiers. Each of these modes typically provide the Soldier with a variety of individual exercise routines that monitor and display exercise duration, training intensity (heart rate/pace/watts, caloric expenditure, and distance completed miles/km). See Figure 6-5 for examples of various types of endurance training equipment. Use of STMs not only improves strength, but also builds muscle mass for higher caloric expenditure and stability for rehabilitation and reconditioning of the injured body part.

TRAINING FREQUENCY

6-38. Training frequency refers to the number of training sessions conducted per day or week. Training frequency is determined by exercise duration and training intensity. Training sessions that involve high intensity or longer duration may necessitate less frequent training to allow for adequate recovery. Endurance and mobility, as well as strength and mobility training frequency, is three exercise sessions per week for each, for a total of six reconditioning PRT sessions. If five days of training occur, then three days are dedicated to endurance and mobility and two days are dedicated to strength and mobility for one week. The following week will consist of three days of strength and mobility and two days of endurance and mobility training.

EXERCISE DURATION

6-39. Exercise duration is 20 minutes or longer and varies from machine to machine, depending on the intensity of the exercise routine being performed (hill profile, speed, degree of incline, resistance). Most exercise sessions of high or moderate intensity should last 20 to 30 minutes. Endurance exercise sessions that address additional caloric expenditure for body fat reduction should be of low intensity and may last up to 60 minutes. The duration for STM exercise is 1-3 sets of 10 repetitions of each exercise for each major muscle group. Refer to the STM drill later in this chapter for specific instructions on the conduct of each exercise.

TRAINING INTENSITY

6-40. Training intensity is typically monitored and displayed on the exercise equipment control panel in terms of heart rate, pace (mph/kph, step rate), watts, kiloponds, caloric expenditure (kcals), or resistance for ETMs and weight lifted (number of plates, pin placement, pounds, or kilograms) for STMs.

STABILITY TRAINING

6-41. Stability is dependent upon structural strength and body management. Regular precise performance of 4C and the HSD form a foundation of good stability for physical performance. These drills are listed in detail throughout the following pages in this chapter.

4 FOR THE CORE

6-42. The abdomen, lower spine, and pelvis comprise the trunk (core) of the body. This area must be stable so the limbs have a fixed base from which to create powerful movements. The abdominal and back muscles form a supportive ring around the spine. Soldiers are only as strong as their weakest link; so all these muscles must be trained in a manner that mimics there function. In reconditioning, 4C and HSD are performed daily before engaging in other PRT activities. During the toughening phase, 4C is performed after preparation and prior to strength and mobility activities. Four for the core may also be performed outside regular PRT sessions as supplemental training. Do not exceed 60 seconds for each 4C exercise. The following commands are used for 4C exercises.

6-43. Exercises 1 and 3 (bent leg raise and back bridge):

  • Starting Position, MOVE.
  • Ready, EXERCISE.
  • Starting Position, MOVE.
  • Position of Attention, MOVE.

6-44. Exercises 2 and 4 (side bridge and quadraplex) are both performed on the right and left sides. The commands for execution for this exercise and changing sides are as follows:

  • Starting Position, MOVE.
  • Ready, EXERCISE.
  • Starting Position, MOVE.
  • Change Position, MOVE.
  • Ready, EXERCISE.
  • Starting Position, MOVE.
  • Position of Attention, MOVE.

6-45. The goal is to hold each exercise position for 60 seconds. If the Soldier is unable to do this, he will follow the instructions for each exercise to momentarily change position and return to the prescribed exercise position. Detailed descriptions of each 4C exercise follows.

4 FOR THE CORE

EXERCISE 1: BENT-LEG RAISE

6-46. Lying in the starting position for the sit-up, place the fingers of both hands underneath the small of the back. Raise the feet off of the ground until both the hips and knees flex to 90 degrees. Contract the abdominals as if preparing for a blow to the stomach. Another way to perform this drawing in maneuver is to imagine pulling the navel toward the spine. Think about the amount of pressure on the fingers created by the contraction of the abdominals. Maintain the same degree of pressure while slowly straightening the legs. As soon as the Soldier can no longer maintain the same degree of pressure on his fingers, he brings his legs back to the 90-degree position and repeat until one minute has elapsed (Figure 6-6).

4 FOR THE CORE

EXERCISE 2: SIDE BRIDGE

6-47. Lay on either side with the upper body off the ground, supported by the elbow, forearm, and fist. Cross the bottom leg in front of the top leg, keeping the feet together. The legs may also be positioned with the knees together and bent 90 degrees. Firmly press into the ground with the supporting arm, and then raise the trunk and pelvis straight upward until they form a straight line with the legs and knees. Hold this position while continuing to breathe. Switch to the other side after one minute. If he cannot hold for one minute, lower, rest briefly, then repeat until one minute has elapsed (Figure 6-7).

4 FOR THE CORE

EXERCISE 3: BACK BRIDGE

6-48. Lying on the back with knees bent at 90 degrees, arms extended sideward at 45 degrees and feet on the marching surface, perform the drawing-in maneuver. Once the abdominal contraction is established, raise the hips off of the ground until the trunk and thighs form a generally straight line. The spine must not arch to achieve this position. With the buttocks still up, straighten the left leg until it aligns with the trunk and thigh. Don’t let the trunk and pelvis sag on the unsupported side. Hold five seconds, and then switch to the other leg. Repeat for one minute. If the spine begins to sag, arch, or tilt, lower to the starting position, rest for 3 to 5 seconds, then, try again (Figure 6-8). The goal is to maintain the back bridge position for 60 seconds alternating leg raises as needed.

4 FOR THE CORE

EXERCISE 4: QUADRAPLEX

6-49. The starting position is on the hands and knees with the back flat. Contract the abdominal muscles as described in the bent-leg raise. Without rotating the trunk or sagging or arching the spine, straighten the left leg to the rear and the right arm to the front. Hold for at least 5 seconds, recover to the starting position if needed, then return to the quadraplex. The goal is to hold each quadraplex position (left and right) for 60 seconds each. Alternate the arm and leg movements on subsequent repetitions, repeating for one minute. The key to this exercise is controlled lowering and raising of the opposite arm and leg while keeping the rest of the body aligned and still (Figure 6-9).

HIP STABILITY DRILL

6-50. The HSD, like 4C, trains the hip and upper thigh areas three-dimensionally, developing the basic strength and mobility needed for stability to perform functional movements. In reconditioning, the HSD is performed daily immediately after 4C and before engaging in other PRT activities. During the toughening phase, the HSD is performed after preparation and prior to endurance and mobility activities. The HSD may also be performed outside regular PRT sessions as supplemental training. In the HSD, perform no more than 10 repetitions of exercises 1 through 4 and do not exceed 30 seconds for each exercise position in exercise 5. If more repetitions are desired, repeat the entire drill.

HIP STABILITY DRILL

EXERCISE 1: LATERAL LEG RAISE

(5 repetitions on each side)

Purpose: This exercise strengthens lateral hip and upper leg muscles (Figure 6-10).

Starting Position 1: Lay on the right side with the legs extended straight to the side and feet together with toes pointing straight ahead. Support the upper body with the right elbow. The elbow is bent at 90 degrees, the upper arm is perpendicular to the ground and the right hand makes a fist vertical to the ground.

Starting Position 2: Lay on the left side with the legs extended straight to the side and feet together with toes pointing straight ahead. Support the upper body with the left elbow. The elbow is bent at 90 degrees, the upper arm is perpendicular to the ground and the left hand makes a fist vertical to the ground.

Commands: The commands for the lateral leg raise are as follows:

  • Starting Position, MOVE.
  • Ready, EXERCISE (count as a 4-count exercise IAW Chapter 7, Execution of Training, paragraph 7-29).
  • Change Position, MOVE.
  • Ready, EXERCISE (count as a 4-count exercise IAW Chapter 7, Execution of Training, paragraph 7-29).
  • Position of Attention, MOVE.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Raise the top leg so the top foot is 6 to 8 inches above the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Raise the top leg so the top foot is 6 to 8 inches above the ground.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Face to the front of the formation, maintaining a generally straight line with the body.
  • On counts 1 and 3, keep the knee of the raised leg straight and the foot pointing forward. The top leg raises no more than 6-8 inches above the ground.
  • Place the top hand over the stomach throughout the exercise.

Precaution: N/A

HIP STABILITY DRILL

EXERCISE 2: MEDIAL LEG RAISE

(5 repetitions on each side)

Purpose: This exercise strengthens the inner thigh and hip muscles (Figure 6-11).

Starting Position 1: Lay on the left side with the left leg extended straight to the side and the right leg bent at 90 degrees with the right foot flat on the ground behind the left leg. Support the upper body with the left elbow. The elbow is bent at 90 degrees, the upper arm is perpendicular to the ground and the left hand makes a fist vertical to the ground.

Starting Position 2: Lay on the right side with the right leg extended straight to the side and the left leg bent at 90 degrees with the left foot flat on the ground behind the right leg. Support the upper body with the right elbow. The elbow is bent at 90 degrees, the upper arm is perpendicular to the ground and the right hand makes a fist vertical to the ground.

Commands: The commands for the lateral leg raise are as follows:

  • Starting Position, MOVE.
  • Ready, EXERCISE (count as a 4-count exercise IAW Chapter 7, Execution of Training, paragraph 7-29).
  • Change Position, MOVE.
  • Ready, EXERCISE (count as a 4-count exercise IAW Chapter 7, Execution of Training, paragraph 7-29).
  • Position of Attention, MOVE.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Raise the bottom leg so the bottom foot is 6-8 inches above the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Raise the bottom leg so the bottom foot is 6-8 inches above the ground.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Keep the hips facing forward and the body in a generally straight line.
  • Keep the toes facing forward on the bottom leg.
  • Place the top hand over the stomach throughout the exercise.

• Do not raise the bottom foot higher than 6-8 inches above the ground. Precaution: N/A

HIP STABILITY DRILL

EXERCISE 3: BENT-LEG LATERAL RAISE

(5 repetitions on each side)

Purpose: This exercise strengthens hip rotator muscles (Figure 6-12).

Starting Position 1: Lay on the right side with the legs bent at 90 degrees and feet together with toes pointing straight ahead. Support the upper body with the right elbow. The elbow is bent at 90 degrees, the upper arm is perpendicular to the ground and the right hand makes a fist vertical to the ground.

Starting Position 2: Lay on the left side with the legs bent at 90 degrees and feet together with toes pointing straight ahead. Support the upper body with the left elbow. The elbow is bent at 90 degrees, the upper arm is perpendicular to the ground, and the left hand makes a fist vertical to the ground.

Commands: The commands for the lateral leg raise are as follows:

  • Starting Position, MOVE.
  • Ready, EXERCISE (count as a 4-count exercise IAW Chapter 7, Execution of Training, paragraph 7-29).
  • Change Position, MOVE.
  • Ready, EXERCISE (count as a 4-count exercise IAW Chapter 7, Execution of Training, paragraph 7-29).
  • Position of Attention, MOVE.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Raise the top leg about 12 inches above the ground, keeping the feet together.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Raise the top leg about 12 inches above the ground, keeping the feet together.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Face to the front of the formation, maintaining a generally straight line with the body, from the knees to the torso.
  • Keep the feet together throughout the exercise.
  • Place the top hand over the stomach throughout the exercise.

Precaution: N/A

HIP STABILITY DRILL

EXERCISE 4: SINGLE-LEG TUCK

(5 repetitions on each side)

Purpose: This exercise strengthens the hip flexors, lateral hip, and upper leg muscles (Figure 6-13).

Starting Position 1: Lay on the right side with the legs extended straight to the side, with the left leg 6 to 8 inches above the ground, and toes pointing straight ahead. Support the upper body with the right elbow. The elbow is bent at 90 degrees, the upper arm is perpendicular to the ground, and the right hand makes a fist vertical to the ground.

Starting Position 2: Lay on the left side with the legs extended straight to the side with the right leg 6 to 8 inches above the ground and toes pointing straight ahead. Support the upper body with the left elbow. The elbow is bent at 90 degrees, the upper arm is perpendicular to the ground, and the left hand makes a fist vertical to the ground.

Commands: The commands for the lateral leg raise are as follows:

  • Starting Position, MOVE.
  • Ready, EXERCISE(count as a 4-count exercise IAW Chapter 7, Execution of Training, paragraph 7-29) .
  • Change Position, MOVE.
  • Ready, EXERCISE (count as a 4-count exercise IAW Chapter 7, Execution of Training, paragraph 7-29).
  • Position of Attention, MOVE.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Bring the thigh of the top leg toward the chest, bending the knee at 90-degrees.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Bring the thigh of the top leg toward the chest, bending the knee at 90-degrees.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Face to the front of the formation, maintaining a generally straight line with the body.
  • The top foot remains 6-8 inches above the ground throughout the exercise.

• Place the top hand over the stomach throughout the exercise. Precaution: N/A

HIP STABILITY DRILL

EXERCISE 5: SINGLE-LEG OVER

(20-30 seconds on each side)

Purpose: This exercise develops flexibility of the hips and lower back muscles (Figure 6-14).

Starting Position 1: Supine position with arms sideward, palms down.

Movement: On the command, ―Ready, STRETCH,‖ turn the body to right, bend the left knee to 90 degrees over the right leg, grasp the outside of the left knee with the right hand, and pull toward the right. Hold this position for 20-30 seconds. On the command, ―Starting Position, MOVE,‖ assume the starting position. On the command, ―Change Position, Ready, STRETCH,‖ turn the body to left, bend the right knee to 90-degrees over the left leg and grasp the outside of the right knee with the left hand and pull toward the left. Hold this position for 20-30 seconds. On the command, ―Starting Position, MOVE,‖ assume the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, the arms are directed to the sides at 90-degrees to the trunk; the fingers and thumbs are extended and joined.
  • In Exercise Position 1, keep the left shoulder, arm, and hand on the ground.
  • In Exercise Position 2, keep the right shoulder, arm, and hand on the ground.
  • Head remains on the ground throughout the exercise.

Precaution: N/A

SHOULDER STABILITY DRILL

6-51. The shoulder stability drill (SSD), Figure 6-2, is designed to develop strength and stability of the shoulders. This drill consists of five, 4-count exercises performed at a SLOW cadence for five repetitions each. The SSD may be performed between preparation, strength, and mobility activities along with 4C and the HSD to better prepare Soldiers in the toughening phase for the rigors of conditioning, climbing, push-up and sit-up drills, and the STC. Soldiers recovering from shoulder injuries may perform exercises in this drill as part of rehabilitation and reconditioning IAW their medical profile.

Table 6-2. Shoulder stability drill (SSD)

1. “I” raise 5 repetitions SLOW cadence
2. “T” raise 5 repetitions SLOW cadence
3: “Y” raise 5 repetitions SLOW cadence
4. “L” raise 5 repetitions SLOW cadence
5. “W” raise 5 repetitions SLOW cadence

SHOULDER STABILITY DRILL

EXERCISE 1: “I” RAISE

Purpose: This exercise develops shoulder strength and stability (Figure 6-15).

Starting Position: Prone position with the head slightly elevated and aligned with the spine. Feet are together and toes are pointed to the rear. The arms remain on the ground and are extended overhead, forming an ―I‖ straight in line with the body. The hands are in a neutral position (perpendicular to the ground) with the thumbs and fingers extended and joined.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Raise both arms 3-6 inches off the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk. The head is slightly elevated and aligned with the spine.
  • On counts 1 and 3, keep the back generally straight with the head up.
  • Throughout the exercise, the arms should be fully extended and the trunk and legs should also be aligned.

Precaution: Keep the head slightly elevated throughout the exercise and do not jerk the body into the up positions on counts 1 and 3.

SHOULDER STABILITY DRILL

EXERCISE 2: “T” RAISE

Purpose: This exercise develops shoulder strength and stability (Figure 6-16).

Starting Position: Prone position with the head slightly elevated and aligned with the spine. Feet are together and toes are pointed to the rear. The arms remain on the ground and are extended sideward at 90 degrees to the trunk, forming a ―T.‖ The hands are in a neutral position (perpendicular to the ground) with the thumbs and fingers extended and joined.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Raise both arms 3-6 inches off the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk. The head is slightly elevated and aligned with the spine.
  • On counts 1 and 3, keep the back generally straight with the head up.
  • Throughout the exercise, the arms should be fully extended and the trunk and legs should also be aligned.

Precaution: Keep the head slightly elevated throughout the exercise and do not jerk the body into the up positions on counts 1 and 3.

SHOULDER STABILITY DRILL

EXERCISE 3: “Y” RAISE

Purpose: This exercise develops shoulder strength and stability (Figure 6-17).

Starting Position: Prone position with the head slightly elevated and aligned with the spine. Feet are together and toes are pointed to the rear. The arms remain on the ground and are extended overhead at 45 degrees to the trunk, forming a ―Y.‖ The hands are in a neutral position (perpendicular to the ground) with the thumbs and fingers extended and joined.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Raise both arms 3-6 inches off the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk. The head is slightly elevated and aligned with the spine.
  • On counts 1 and 3, keep the back generally straight with the head up.
  • Throughout the exercise, the arms should be fully extended and the trunk and legs should also be aligned.

Precaution: Keep the head slightly elevated throughout the exercise and do not jerk the body into the up positions on counts 1 and 3.

SHOULDER STABILITY DRILL

EXERCISE 4: “L” RAISE

Purpose: This exercise develops shoulder strength and stability (Figure 6-18).

Starting Position: Prone position with the head slightly elevated and aligned with the spine. Feet are together and toes are pointed to the rear. The arms remain on the ground and are extended sideward and the elbows are bent at 90 degrees, forming an ―L.‖ The hands are in a neutral position (perpendicular to the ground) with the thumbs and fingers extended and joined.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Raise both arms 3-6 inches off the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk. The head is slightly elevated and aligned with the spine.
  • On counts 1 and 3, keep the back generally straight with the head up.
  • Throughout the exercise, the arms maintain an ―L‖ and the trunk and legs should also be aligned.

Precaution: Keep the head slightly elevated throughout the exercise and do not jerk the body into the up positions on counts 1 and 3.

SHOULDER STABILITY DRILL

EXERCISE 5: “W” RAISE

Purpose: This exercise develops shoulder strength and stability (Figure 6-19).

Starting Position: Prone position with the head slightly elevated and aligned with the spine. Feet are together and toes are pointed to the rear. The arms remain on the ground and are extended downward at 45 degrees to the trunk and the elbow bent also at 45 degrees, forming a ―W.‖ The hands are in a neutral position (perpendicular to the ground) with the thumbs and fingers extended and joined.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Raise both arms 3-6 inches off the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk. The head is slightly elevated and aligned with the spine.
  • On counts 1 and 3, keep the back generally straight with the head up.
  • Throughout the exercise, the arms maintain a ―W‖ and the trunk and legs should also be aligned.

Precaution: Keep the head slightly elevated throughout the exercise and do not jerk the body into the up positions on counts 1 and 3.

STRENGTH AND MOBILITY TRAINING

6-52. Strength and mobility training in reconditioning consists of the STM drill for level I, CD 1 and 2, and the PSD with modifications for level II. The following pages in this chapter describe in detail the conduct of these drills and modifications.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

6-53. The STM drill is conducted on strength and mobility training days IAW the Soldiers’ physical profile. The exercises may be modified to meet the Soldiers’ capabilities. The following exercises are examples of each exercise in the STM and modifications of these exercises that may be employed to accommodate Soldiers’ specific profiles.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

EXERCISE 1: LEG PRESS

Purpose: This exercise develops strength in the hip and thigh muscles (Figure 6-20).

Starting Position: Seated position with the knees bent at 90-degrees and feet flat on the foot platform. The hips, low back, shoulders, and head are firmly against the seat back with the eyes looking straight ahead. A natural arch is maintained in the lower back. Select the appropriate weight and ensure the pin is secure in the weight stack. Hands are relaxed and placed on the handgrips.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Straighten the legs slowly until they are fully extended, not locked.
  2. Return to the starting position in a slow, controlled motion.

Check Points:

  • The hips, low back, shoulders, and head are firmly against the seat back.
  • Maintain a natural arch in the lower back.

• Exhale on count 1 and inhale on count 2. Precautions: Do not arch the back or allow the hips to rise off the seat. Do not grip the handgrips tightly.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 1A: MODIFIED LEG PRESS

6-54. This exercise (Figure 6-21) is performed the same as the leg press. However, the range of motion is much less. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range of motion may gradually increase until the exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion and perform the exercise to standard. The Soldier may also employ the single-leg press to maintain a heavy resistance on the good leg and/or to reduce the resistance on the injured leg.

MODIFIED EXERCISE 1B: SINGLE-LEG PRESS

6-55. This exercise (Figure 6-22) is performed much like the leg press, using only one leg at a time. The range

of motion and resistance is decreased for the injured leg. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range of

motion may gradually increase until the exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion. The single leg press is used to maintain a heavy resistance on the good leg and/or to reduce the resistance on the injured leg.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

EXERCISE 2: LEG CURL

Purpose: This exercise develops strength in the back of the upper leg muscles (Figure 6-23).

Starting Position: Seated position, knees aligned with the center axis of the machine. The lower leg pad is adjusted to contact the lower legs just above the ankle, allowing the lower leg to be fully extended, but not locked. The lower legs and feet are relaxed. The thigh pad is positioned just above the knees. The hips, low back, shoulders, and head are firmly against the seat back with the eyes looking straight ahead. A natural arch is maintained in the lower back. Select the appropriate weight and ensure the pin is secure in the weight stack. Hands are relaxed and placed on the handgrips on the top of the thigh pad.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Pull the lower legs to the rear slowly until the lower legs are flexed, forming a 90-degree angle between the upper and lower legs.
  2. Return to the starting position by slowly raising the lower legs.

Check Points:

  • Knees are aligned with the center axis of the machine.
  • The leg pad contacts the lower legs just behind the ankles.
  • The hips, low back, shoulders, and head are firmly against the seat back.
  • Maintain a natural arch in the lower back.

• Exhale on count 1 and inhale on count 2. Precautions: Do not arch the back or allow the hips to rise off the seat. Do not grip the handgrips tightly.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 2A: MODIFIED LEG CURL (SEATED)

6-56. This exercise (Figure 6-24) is performed the same as the leg curl; however, the range of motion is much

less. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range of motion may gradually increase until the exercise is

performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion and perform the exercise to standard.

MODIFIED EXERCISE 2B: SINGLE-LEG CURL (SEATED)

6-57. This exercise (Figure 6-25) is performed much like the leg curl, using only one leg at a time. The range of

motion and resistance is decreased for the injured leg. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range of motion

may gradually increase until the exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion. The single-leg curl is used to maintain a heavy resistance on the good leg and/or to reduce the resistance on the injured leg.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 2C: MODIFIED LEG CURL (PRONE)

6-58. This exercise (Figure 6-26) is performed in the prone position through a limited range of motion. Soldiers with low back or hip injuries may prefer to use the seated leg curl if it is available. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range of motion may gradually increase until the exercise is performed through a full range of motion (heels to the buttocks). The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion.

MODIFIED EXERCISE 2D: SINGLE-LEG CURL (PRONE)

6-59. This exercise (Figure 6-27) is performed using only one leg at a time. Soldiers with low back or hip injuries may prefer to use the seated leg curl if it is available. The range of motion and resistance is decreased

for the injured leg. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range of motion may gradually increase until the

exercise is performed to standard (heel to the buttocks). The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion. The single-leg curl is used to maintain a heavy resistance on the good leg and to reduce the resistance on the injured leg.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

EXERCISE 3: HEEL RAISE

Purpose: This exercise develops strength in the back of the lower leg muscles (Figure 6-28).

Starting Position: Stand with the balls of the feet on the elevated platform, toes pointing straight ahead, feet aligned
directly below the hips, and the knees slightly flexed.
Cadence: SLOW
Count:

  1. Raise the entire body slowly by pulling the heels up, maintaining a slight bend in the knees, and a natural arch in the low back.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Maintain a natural arch in the lower back.
  • Keep the knees slightly flexed throughout the exercise.
  • Keep the head and neck in a neutral position, looking straight ahead.
  • Keep the knees aligned over the feet

• Exhale on count 1 and inhale on count 2. Precautions: Avoid flexing or extending the trunk. Do not allow the ankles to turn in or out.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 3A: SINGLE-LEG HEEL RAISE

6-60. This exercise (Figure 6-29) is performed much like the heel raise, using only one leg at a time. The range

of motion and resistance is decreased for the injured leg. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range of

motion may gradually increase until the exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion. The single leg is used to maintain a heavy resistance on the good leg and/or to reduce the resistance on the injured leg.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

EXERCISE 4: CHEST PRESS

Purpose: This exercise develops strength in the arms, shoulders, and chest muscles (Figure 6-30).

Starting Position: Seated position with the feet firmly on the ground. The seat is adjusted so a 90-degree angle is formed between the upper and lower arms with the shoulders directly below the handgrips. The hips, low back, shoulders, and head are firmly against the seat back with the eyes looking straight ahead. A natural arch is maintained in the lower back. Select the appropriate weight and ensure the pin is secure in the weight stack.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Push upward until both arms are fully extended, but not locked.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Feet remain on the ground, with hips, back, shoulders, and head firmly on the bench.
  • Keep the head and neck in a neutral position, looking straight ahead.

• Exhale on count 1 and inhale on count 2. Precaution: Do not arch the back or allow the hips to rise off the bench.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 4A: MODIFIED CHEST PRESS

6-61. This exercise (Figure 6-31) is performed the same as the chest press, but with much less range of motion. The elbows will not flex below 90 degrees as the resistance is lowered, nor will they fully straighten when the

resistance is raised. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range of motion may gradually increase until the

exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion and perform the exercise to standard.

MODIFIED EXERCISE 4B: SINGLE-ARM CHEST PRESS

6-62. This exercise (Figure 6-32) is performed much like the chest press, using only one arm at a time. The

range of motion and resistance is decreased for the injured side. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range

of motion may gradually increase until the exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion. The single-arm chest press is used to maintain a heavy resistance on the good side and/or to reduce the resistance on the injured side.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

EXERCISE 5: SEATED ROW

Purpose: This exercise develops strength in the arm and back muscles (Figure 6-33).

Starting Position: Seated position with the feet firmly planted on the foot supports. Lean forward and grasp the handgrips with the hands in a neutral closed grip. Sit erect so the upper body is perpendicular to the floor. Select the appropriate weight and ensure the pin is secure in the weight stack.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Simultaneously, bend the elbows and pull the handgrips to the chest or upper abdomen while keeping the trunk rigid and the back flat.
  2. Return to the starting position by slowly extending the elbows.

Check Points:

  • Feet remain flat on the ground or foot supports.
  • The trunk is erect and the back is flat.
  • Keep the head and neck in a neutral position, looking straight ahead or slightly downward.
  • The arms are about parallel to the ground.
  • On count 1 ensure the elbows point up and to the rear.

• Exhale on count 1 and inhale on count 2. Precautions: Do not jerk the trunk to move the handgrips towards the chest. Maintain a flat back.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 5A: STRAIGHT-ARM SEATED ROW

6-63. This exercise (Figure 6-34) is performed the same as the seated row, however, the range of motion is much less. The elbows remain fully extended and the arms straight, as the resistance is lowered and when the resistance is raised. As the Soldier’s range of motion improves, he may employ the single-arm seated row to maintain a heavy resistance on the good side and/or to reduce the resistance on the injured side.

MODIFIED EXERCISE 5B: SINGLE-ARM SEATED ROW

This exercise (Figure 6-35) is performed much like the seated row, using only one arm at a time. The range of

motion and resistance is decreased for the injured side. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range of motion

may gradually increase until the exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion. The single-arm seated row is used to maintain a heavy resistance on the good side and/or to reduce the resistance on the injured side.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

EXERCISE 6: OVERHEAD PRESS

Purpose: This exercise develops strength in the arm and shoulder muscles (Figure 6-36).

Starting Position: The Soldier assumes a seated position with the feet firmly on the ground. The Soldier adjusts the seat to achieve a 90-degree angle between the Soldier’s upper and lower arms, with the shoulders directly below the handgrips. The hips, low back, shoulders, and head rest firmly against the seat back. The Soldier looks straight ahead, maintaining a natural arch in the lower back. The Soldier selects the appropriate weight and ensures the pin is secure in the weight stack.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Push upward until both arms are fully extended, but not locked.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Feet remain on the ground, with hips, back, shoulders, and head firmly on the bench.
  • Keep the head and neck in a neutral position, looking straight ahead.

• Exhale on count 1 and inhale on count 2. Precaution: Do not arch the back or allow the hips to rise off the bench.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 6A: MODIFIED OVERHEAD PRESS

6-64. This exercise (Figure 6-37) is performed the same as the overhead press, but with much less range of motion. The elbows will not flex below 90 degrees as the resistance is lowered, nor will they fully straighten when the resistance is raised. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range of motion may gradually increase until the exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion and perform the exercise to standard.

MODIFIED EXERCISE 6B: SINGLE-ARM OVERHEAD PRESS

6-65. This exercise (Figure 6-38) is performed much like the overhead press, using only one arm at a time. The range of motion and resistance is decreased for the injured side. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range of motion may gradually increase until the exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion. The single-arm overhead press is used to maintain a heavy resistance on the good side and/or to reduce the resistance on the injured side.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

EXERCISE 7: LAT PULL-DOWN

Purpose: This exercise develops strength in the arm and back muscles (Figure 6-39).

Starting Position: Select the appropriate weight and ensure the pin is secure in the weight stack before assuming the starting position. Sit erect and adjust the roller pad so it is firm against the upper thigh and hip. Grasp the bar with a closed, pronated grip and assume a seated position with the hips against the roller pad and the feet flat on the ground. The upper body is perpendicular to the floor.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Keeping the arms straight and elbows rotated out to the side and slightly flexed, simultaneously bend the elbows and pull bar toward the shoulders until the upper arms are parallel to the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position by slowly extending the elbows.

Check Points:

  • Feet remain flat on the ground and the trunk is erect.
  • Maintain a natural arch in the lower back.
  • Keep the head and neck in a neutral position, looking straight ahead or slightly upward.
  • Arms are straight and elbows rotated out to the side and slightly flexed and in direct line with the cable.
  • Exhale on count 1 and inhale on count 2.

Precaution: Do not jerk the trunk or lean back to move the bar toward the shoulders.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 7A: STRAIGHT-ARM LAT PULL-DOWN

6-66. This exercise (Figure 6-40) is performed the same as the lat pull-down, however, the range of motion is much less. The elbows remain fully extended and the arms straight, as the resistance is lowered and when the resistance is raised. As the Soldier’s range of motion improves, he may employ the single-arm lat pull-down to maintain a heavy resistance on the good side and/or to reduce the resistance on the injured side.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 7B: SINGLE-ARM LAT PULL-DOWN

6-67. This exercise (Figure 6-41) is performed much like the lat pull-down, using only one arm at a time. The

range of motion and resistance is decreased for the injured side. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range

of motion may gradually increase until the exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion. The single-arm lat pull-down is used to maintain a heavy resistance on the good side and/or to reduce the resistance on the injured side.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

EXERCISE 8: LATERAL RAISE

Purpose: This exercise develops strength in the shoulder and neck muscles (Figure 6-42).

Starting Position: Seated position with the feet firmly on the ground. The seat is adjusted so a 90-degree angle is formed between the upper and lower arms. The hips, lower back, shoulders, and head are firmly against the seat back with the eyes looking straight ahead. A natural arch is maintained in the lower back. Select the appropriate weight and ensure the pin is secure in the weight stack.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Raise both arms upward until they are parallel to the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Feet remain on the ground, with hips, back, shoulders, and head firmly on the bench.
  • Keep the head and neck in a neutral position, looking straight ahead.
  • Exhale on count 1 and inhale on count 2.

Precautions: Do not arch the back or allow the hips to rise off the bench. Do not raise arms above parallel to the ground.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 8A: SINGLE-ARM LATERAL RAISE

6-68. This exercise (Figure 6-43) is performed much like the lateral raise, using only one arm at a time. The range of motion and resistance is decreased for the injured side. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range of motion may gradually increase until the exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion. The single-arm lateral raise is used to maintain a heavy resistance on the good side and/or to reduce the resistance on the injured side.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

EXERCISE 9: TRICEPS EXTENSION

Purpose: This exercise develops strength in the triceps muscles (Figure 6-44).

Starting Position (Standing): Straddle stance with a 90-degree angle formed at the upper and lower arms. Select the appropriate weight and ensure the pin is secure in the weight stack. Maintain an erect position, eyes looking straight ahead, grasping the bar with a closed, pronated grip.

Starting Position (Seated): Seated position with the feet firmly on the ground. The seat is adjusted so a 90-degree angle is formed between the upper and lower arms, with elbows shoulder-width apart on the supporting pad, and hands in a closed-grip. The hips and low back are firmly against the seat back with the eyes looking straight ahead. A natural arch is maintained in the lower back. Select the appropriate weight and ensure the pin is secure in the weight stack.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Push downward until both arms are fully extended, but not locked.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Feet remain on the ground, with hips and back firmly on the bench during seated triceps extension.
  • Keep the head and neck in a neutral position, looking straight ahead.
  • Exhale on count 1 and inhale on count 2.

Precautions: Do not lean forward while performing standing triceps extension. Do not arch the back or allow the hips to rise off the bench during seated exercise.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 9A: MODIFIED TRICEPS EXTENSION

6-69. This exercise (Figures 6-45 and 6-46) is performed the same as the triceps extension, but the range of motion is much less. The elbows will not fully flex as the resistance is lowered, nor will they fully straighten when the resistance is raised. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range of motion may gradually increase until the exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion and perform the exercise to standard.


STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 9B: SINGLE-ARM TRICEPS EXTENSION

6-70. This exercise (Figures 6-47 and 6-48) is performed much like the triceps extension, using only one arm at

a time. The range of motion and resistance is decreased for the injured side. As the Soldier’s condition

improves, the range of motion may gradually increase until the exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion. The single-arm triceps extension is used to maintain a heavy resistance on the good side and/or to reduce the resistance on the injured side.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 9B: SINGLE-ARM TRICEPS EXTENSION (CONTINUED)

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

EXERCISE 10: BICEPS CURL

Purpose: This exercise develops strength in the upper biceps muscles (Figure 6-49).

Starting Position: Seated position with the feet firmly on the ground. The seat is adjusted so the arms are straight, with elbows shoulder-width apart. The back of the upper arms are on the supporting pad with hands in a closed-grip. The hips and low back are firmly against the seat back with the eyes looking straight ahead. A natural arch is maintained in the lower back. Select the appropriate weight and ensure the pin is secure in the weight stack.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Pull upward until both arms are fully flexed.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Feet remain on the ground, with hips and back firmly on the bench during seated triceps extension.
  • Keep the head and neck in a neutral position, looking straight ahead.
  • Exhale on count 1 and inhale on count 2.

Precautions: Do not arch the back or allow the hips to rise off the bench. Do not arch backward while performing the biceps curl.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 10A: MODIFIED BICEPS CURL

6-71. This exercise (Figure 6-50) is performed the same as the biceps curl, but the range of motion is much less. The elbows will not fully flex as the resistance is raised, nor will they fully straighten when the resistance is lowered. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range of motion may gradually increase until the exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion and perform the exercise to standard.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 10B: SINGLE-ARM BICEPS CURL

6-72. This exercise (Figure 6-51) is performed much like the biceps curl, using only one arm at a time. The

range of motion and resistance is decreased for the injured side. As the Soldier’s condition improves, the range

of motion may gradually increase until the exercise is performed to standard. The resistance should not be increased until the Soldier can move through the full range of motion. The single-arm biceps curl is used to maintain a heavy resistance on the good side and to reduce resistance on the injured side.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

EXERCISE 11: TRUNK FLEXION

Purpose: This exercise develops strength in the abdominal muscles (Figure 6-52).

Starting Position: Seated position with the feet firmly on the ground. Select the appropriate weight and ensure the pin is secure in the weight stack. The seat is adjusted so the chest pad is located on the upper chest, below the collarbone. The elbows are shoulder-width apart and bent at 90 degrees, with hands in a closed-grip. The hips and low back are firmly against the seat back with the eyes looking straight ahead.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Bend forward, flexing the trunk, and bringing the chest pad to the thighs.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Feet remain on the ground, with hips and back firmly on the bench.
  • Keep the head and neck in a neutral position.

• Exhale on count 1 and inhale on count 2. Precautions: Do not jerk into position or allow the hips to rise off the seat.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 11: MODIFIED TRUNK FLEXION

6-73. Physical profiles may limit the range of motion at which Soldiers are able to safely perform trunk flexion exercises. The weight load should be low and the range of motion of the movements should be within the comfort zone of the Soldier (Figure 6-53). Gradually increase the weight load and range of motion as tolerated until the exercise can be performed to standard.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

EXERCISE 12: TRUNK EXTENSION

Purpose: This exercise develops strength in the low back muscles (Figure 6-54).
Starting Position: Sit in the machine, leaning slightly forward, with the back firmly against the padded lever

arm. Select the appropriate weight and ensure the pin is secure in the weight stack. The hands grip the support
bars using a neutral, closed-grip. The head is in a neutral position with the eyes looking straight ahead.
Cadence: SLOW
Count:

  1. Raise the upper body and continue extending the trunk, moving to the supine position.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Keep the head and neck in a neutral position.
  • Exhale on count 1 and inhale on count 2.

Precautions: Do not jerk into position. Keep the hips and low back in contact with the pads throughout the exercise.

STRENGTH TRAINING MACHINE DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 12: MODIFIED TRUNK EXTENSION

6-74. Physical profiles may limit the range of motion at which Soldiers are able to safely perform trunk extension exercises. The weight load should be low and the range of motion of the movements should be within the comfort zone of the Soldier (Figure 6-55). Gradually increase the weight load and range of motion as tolerated until the exercise can be performed to standard.

LEVEL II RECONDITIONING DRILLS AND ACTIVITIES

6-75. Soldiers in level II reconditioning are on profile, just off of profile, or cleared to begin level II reconditioning. These Soldiers will perform PRT drills and activities, in some cases, modified to fit the Soldier’s specific physical profile or level of injury. See Table 6-3 for the schedule of level II reconditioning drills and activities.

Table 6-3. Reconditioning Level II training schedule

MON TUE WED THU FRI
PREPARATION: PD ACTIVITIES: HSD (5 reps) MMD1 (1 rep) Walk to Run (30 min) RECOVERY: RD PREPARATION: PD ACTIVITIES: 4C (60 secs) CD 1 (5 reps) CL 1 (5 reps) RECOVERY: RD PREPARATION: PD ACTIVITIES: HSD (5 reps) MMD1 (1 rep) Walk to Run (30 min) RECOVERY: RD PREPARATION: PD ACTIVITIES 4C (60 secs) CD 1 (5 reps) CL 1 (5 reps) RECOVERY: RD PREPARATION: PD ACTIVITIES: HSD (5 reps) MMD1 (1 rep) Walk to Run (30 min) RECOVERY: RD

6-76. Preparation, military movement drill 1, CD 1, and recovery will be the same as for unit PRT or may be modified to follow a safe exercise progression. The CL will be performed with spotters as in unit PRT. Spotters must be especially aware of each Soldier’s physical limitation. The walk-to-run program safely progresses Soldiers from bouts of walking to increased bouts of continuous running for 30 consecutive minutes. Each week the walking time decreases as the running time increases to reach the 30-minute continuous running goal. (Table 6-4 shows how to conduct the walk-to-run program.)

Table 6-4. Reconditioning walk-to-run progression

Week of Training Walk Jog Repetitions Total Time
Week I 4 minutes 2 minutes 5 times 30 minutes
Week II 3 minutes 3 minutes 5 times 30 minutes
Week III 2 minutes 4 minutes 5 times 30 minutes
Week IV 1 minutes 5 minutes 5 times 30 minutes
Week V Run every other day with a goal of reaching thirty consecutive minutes.
Perform the activities for each level every other day. Spend at least one week at each level. Begin Week V runs with a duration of 15 minutes. Walk 5 minutes before and after each session. Progress to 30 consecutive minutes of running over the next 2 to 4 weeks.

Exercise Guidance

6-77. The following exercise guidance is intended for RPLs/ARPLs in the level II reconditioning program. Common sites of pain/injury are given, followed by a discussion of PRT progression. The information below assumes that all profile restrictions have been removed. General exercise guidance is provided for knee injury/pain, foot and ankle injury/pain; lower leg injury/pain, low back injury/pain, and shoulder injury/pain; as well as modifications to exercises based on limitations of various physical profiles. In the pages to follow each of these injury conditions are listed with specific guidance on the conduct of exercise drills and activities as they apply to the knee, foot and ankle, lower leg, back and shoulder pain, and injuries.

Knee Pain/Injury

6-78. Knee pain/injury may require restrictions. In the post-profile recovery period, progress as follows:

Preparation (PD)

6-79. Resume lunging and squatting movements (to include the high jumper) with a reduced range of motion and fewer repetitions. The high jumper should not be resumed until the Soldier has demonstrated proficiency at all other exercises. Resume the high jumper by only rising to the toes on counts one and three, then gradually progress starting with minimal height and few repetitions. When performing the squat thrust, Soldiers should assume the front leaning rest position by initially stepping into and out of the squat position while bearing most of their body weight with their arms. Soldiers must gradually increase the range of motion and repetitions to meet the standards. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Conditioning Drill 1 (CD 1)

6-80. When assuming the starting position for the single-leg push-up, Soldiers should initially step into and out of the squat position to the front leaning rest position. This should be done while bearing most of the body weight with the arms. Allow Soldiers to assume a six-point position if they are unable to maintain good form or keep up with the cadence. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Military Movement Drill 1 (MMD1)

6-81. Resume MMD 1 by reducing the distance from 25 to 15 yards and ensure that the Soldier limits the speed and intensity of movement. For laterals, this means decreasing the crouch and stepping the movements instead of maintaining the normal tempo. For verticals, start with minimal air time and gradually progress to more powerful movements. For the shuttle sprint, ensure that the Soldiers are able to negotiate the turns at walking speed before allowing them to run.

Push-up and Sit-up Drill (PSD)

6-82. When performing the squat thrust, Soldiers assume the front leaning rest position by initially stepping into and out of the squat position while bearing most of their body weight with their arms. Allow Soldiers to assume a six-point position for the push-ups if they are unable to maintain good form or keep up with the cadence. To modify the sit-up, allow Soldiers to initially use their hands to move into and out of the supine position.

Climbing Drill 1 (CL 1)

6-83. Proper spotting is essential in the post-profile period. Soldiers performing CL 1 exercise modifications in level II reconditioning depend greatly on their spotters to assist them through the movements of each exercise. Gradually, they will need less help from the spotters. Eventually, they may complete many, if not all the repetitions, with little or no assistance.

Sustained and Speed Running

6-84. If running is restricted, the Soldier will need to maintain conditioning through the use of ETM, the pool, and walking. When the profile ends or allows a return to running, a systematic progression should be followed. The Soldier must be able to walk for 30 minutes without increasing his symptoms before starting the running progression.

Recovery (RD)

6-85. As with all lunges, the amount of knee bend may be restricted for the rear lunge. The starting position for the extend and flex may be assumed as shown for the front leaning rest position. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground. In the post-profile period, range of motion for some exercises may still be limited. Gradually increase the range of motion over time and work toward the standard execution of each exercise.

Foot and Ankle Pain/Injury

6-86. PRT activities that involve jumping and landing, running, and single leg weight bearing should be resumed with the most caution. During the post-profile recovery period, progress as follows:

Preparation (PD)

6-87. Resume this drill at a slow cadence with few repetitions. The Soldier should resume the high jumper only after demonstrating proficiency in all other exercises. The Soldier resumes the high jumper by only rising to the toes on counts one and three, and then gradually progressing, starting with minimal height and few repetitions. The instructor monitors lunges closely, since they require most of the body weight to shift to a single leg. The stress of lunges can be limited by reducing the stride and the depth of the lunge. Initially, Soldiers might need to do push-ups by stepping back into the front-leaning rest rather than by performing a squat thrust. The instructor allows the Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Military Movement Drill 1 (MMD 1)

6-88. Resume MMD 1 by reducing the distance from 25 to 15 yards and ensure that the Soldier limits the speed and intensity of movement. For laterals, this means decreasing the crouch and stepping the movements instead of maintaining the normal tempo. For verticals, start with minimal air time and gradually progress to more powerful movements. For the shuttle sprint, ensure that Soldiers are able to negotiate the turns at walking speed before allowing them to run.

Conditioning Drill 1 (CD 1)

6-89. When assuming the starting position for the single-leg push-up, Soldiers should initially step into and out of the squat position to the front leaning rest position. This should be done while bearing most of the body weight with the arms. Allow Soldiers to assume a six-point position if they are unable to maintain good form or keep up with the cadence. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Climbing Drill 1 (CL 1)

6-90. Proper spotting is essential in the post-profile period. Encourage hands on spotting for all participants.

Sustained and Speed Running

6-91. While profiled for running, the Soldier will need to maintain conditioning through the use of ETMs, the pool, and walking. When the profile ends or allows a return to running, a systematic progression must be followed. The Soldier must be able to walk for 30 minutes without increasing his symptoms before starting the running progression.

Recovery (RD)

6-92. The starting position for the extend and flex may be assumed as shown for the front leaning rest position. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground. In the post-profile period, range of motion for some exercises may be limited still. Over time, gradually increase the range of motion and work toward the standard execution of each exercise.

Lower Leg Pain/Injury

6-93. PRT activities that involve jumping, landing, and running should be resumed with the most caution. In the post-profile recovery period, progress as follows:

Preparation (PD)

6-94. Resume this drill at a slow cadence with few repetitions. The high jumper should not be resumed until the Soldier has demonstrated proficiency at all other exercises. Resume the high jumper by rising to the toes only on counts one and three, then gradually progress starting with minimal height and few repetitions. Lunges should be monitored closely since they require most of the body weight to shift to a single leg. The stress of lunges can be limited by reducing the stride and the depth of the lunge. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Military Movement Drill 1 (MMD 1)

6-95. Resume MMD 1 by reducing the distance from 25 to 15 yards and ensure that the Soldier limits the speed and intensity of movement. For laterals, this means decreasing the crouch and stepping through the movements instead of maintaining the normal tempo. For verticals, start with minimal air time and gradually progress to more powerful movements.

Conditioning Drill 1 (CD 1)

6-96. When assuming the starting position for the single-leg push-up, Soldiers should initially step into and out of the squat position to the front leaning rest position while bearing most of the body weight with the arms. Allow Soldiers to assume a six-point position if they are unable to maintain good form or keep up with the cadence. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Climbing Drill 1 (CL 1)

6-97. Proper spotting is essential in the post-profile period. Encourage hands on spotting for all participants.

Sustained and Speed Running

6-98. While profiled for running, the Soldier will need to maintain conditioning through the use of ETMs, the pool, and walking. When the profile ends or allows a return to running, a systematic progression should be followed. Soldiers must be able to walk for 30 minutes without increasing their symptoms before starting the running progression.

Recovery (RD)

6-99. These exercises are generally not restricted, though Soldiers may need to use their hands to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground. In the post-profile period, range of motion for some exercises may still be limited. Over time, gradually increase the range of motion and work toward the standard execution of each exercise.

Back Pain or Back Injury

6-100. PRT activities that bend or twist the trunk must be resumed with caution. In the post-profile recovery period, progress as follows:

Preparation (PD)

6-101. Exercises that bend or twist the trunk may have been restricted while on profile. Post-profile, the Soldier starts with a limited range of movement and gradually progresses to the standard positions. Lunges and the squat bender are generally well tolerated, because the trunk remains straight throughout the movement. Post profile, the Soldier resumes the high jumper by rising only to the toes on counts one and three, then gradually progress starting with minimal height and few repetitions. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Military Movement Drill 1 (MMD 1)

6-102. The shuttle sprint will normally be restricted by profile. In the post-profile period, resume the shuttle sprint without touching the hand to the ground on turns, and then gradually work toward bending enough to touch the ground. Resume the other MMD 1 exercises by reducing the distance from 25 to 15 yards and ensure that the Soldier limits the speed and intensity of movement. For laterals, this means decreasing the crouch and stepping through the movements instead of maintaining the normal tempo. For verticals, start with minimal air time and gradually progress to more powerful movements.

Conditioning Drill 1 (CD 1)

6-103. When assuming the starting position for the single-leg push-up, Soldiers should initially step into and out of the squat position to the front leaning rest position while bearing most of their body weight with their arms. Allow Soldiers to assume a six-point position if they are unable to maintain good form or keep up with the cadence. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Climbing Drill 1 (CL 1)

6-104. Proper spotting is essential in the post-profile period. Encourage hands on spotting for all participants.

Sustained and Speed Running

6-105. If profiled for running, the Soldier will need to maintain conditioning through the use of ETMs, the pool, and walking. When the profile ends or allows a return to running, a systematic progression should be followed. The Soldier must be able to walk for 30 minutes without increasing their symptoms before starting the running progression.

Recovery (RD)

6-106. The extend and flex may be restricted by profile. Post-profile, Soldiers should go to the starting position by stepping back into the front-leaning rest position rather than performing a squat thrust. The other exercises should be tolerated in the post-profile period by starting with a reduced range of motion and gradually working toward the standard. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

Shoulder Pain or Shoulder Injury

6-107. PRT activities that involve overhead motion or otherwise stress the shoulder must be resumed with caution. In the post-profile recovery period, progress as follows:

Preparation (PD)

6-108. Exercises that include raising the arms overhead may be restricted by profile. These exercises, unless otherwise restricted by the profile, can still be performed with hands on hips. The push-up will usually be restricted while on profile. After profiling, the Soldier may need to resume the exercise with a modified hand position. Push-up progression may start from the knees. Gradually work toward the standard exercise positions.

Military Movement Drill 1 (MMD 1)

6-109. If this drill is restricted by profile, resume the exercises in the post-profile period by reducing the distance from 25 to 15 yards and ensure that the Soldier limits the speed and intensity of movement. For laterals, this means decreasing the crouch and stepping the movements instead of maintaining the normal tempo. For verticals, start with minimal air time and gradually progress to more powerful movements.

Conditioning Drill 1 (CD 1)

6-110. When assuming the starting position for the single-leg push-up, Soldiers should initially step into and out of the squat position to the front leaning rest position while bearing most of the body weight with the arms. Allow Soldiers to assume a six-point position if they are unable to maintain good form or keep up with the cadence.

Sit-Up (SU)

6-111. Initially, allow Soldiers to use their hands to move into and out of the supine position. An alternate arm position with arms at sides or across the chest may be used.

Climbing Drill 1 (CL1)

6-112. Proper spotting is essential in the post-profile period. Encourage hands-on spotting for all participants.

Recovery (RD)

6-113. The extend and flex is generally the most stressful on the shoulder. The other exercises should be tolerated in the post-profile period by starting with a reduced range-of-motion and gradually working toward the standard. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground.

EXERCISE MODIFICATIONS

6-114. The PD, CD 1, military movement drill 1 (MMD 1), and the RD exercises include a wide range of movements requiring strength, endurance, and mobility using standing, seated, prone, and supine postures. Each exercise may be modified to accommodate various physical limitations. This allows Soldiers to work within their physical profiles, gradually progressing to performing each exercise to standard. The following pages describe each drill with exercise modifications to accommodate various physical profile limitations.

PREPARATION DRILL

EXERCISE 1: BEND AND REACH

Purpose: This exercise develops the ability to squat and reach through the legs. It also serves to prepare the spine and extremities for more vigorous movements by moving the hips and spine through full flexion (Figure 6-56).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with arms overhead.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Squat with the heels flat as the spine rounds forward to allow the straight arms to reach as far as possible between the legs.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • From the starting position, ensure that Soldiers have their hips set, their abdominals tight, and their arms fully extended overhead.
  • The neck flexes to allow the gaze to the rear; this brings the head in line with the bend of the trunk.
  • The heels and feet remain flat on the ground.
  • On counts 2 and 4, they do not go past the starting position.

Precautions: This exercise is always performed at a slow cadence. To protect the back, move into the count 1 position in a slow, controlled manner. Do not bounce into or out of this position, as this may place an excessive load on the back.

PREPARATION DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 1: MODIFIED BEND AND REACH

6-115. The instructor may modify the bend and reach by decreasing the range of motion and limiting the use of the arms. The Soldier may use the modifications shown in Figure 6-57 to exercise within physical profile limitations. The Soldier gradually increases the range of motion and works toward the standard execution of the exercise, then progresses performance to standard.

PREPARATION DRILL

EXERCISE 2: REAR LUNGE

Purpose: This exercise promotes balance, opens up the hip and trunk on the side of the lunge, and develops leg strength (Figure 6-58).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with hands on hips.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Take an exaggerated step backward with the left leg, touching down with the ball of the foot.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1 with the right leg.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Maintain straightness of the back by keeping the abdominal muscles tight throughout the motion.
  • After the foot touches down, allow the body to continue to lower. This promotes flexibility of the hip and trunk.
  • On counts 1 and 3, step straight to the rear, keeping the feet directed forward. When viewed from the front, the feet maintain their distance apart both at the starting position and at the end of counts one and three.
  • Keep the rear leg as straight as possible but not locked.

Precautions: This exercise is always performed at a slow cadence. On counts one and three, move into position in a slow, controlled manner. If the cadence is too fast, it will be difficult to go through a full range of motion.

PREPARATION DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 2: MODIFIED REAR LUNGE

6-116. The rear lunge can be modified (Figure 6-59) by decreasing the range of motion at which it is performed. As with all lunges, the amount of knee bend may be restricted for the rear lunge. The feet may be closer together. Concentrate on trying to gradually lower the body in the lunge position. The Soldier gradually increases the range of motion and works toward the standard execution of the exercise, then progresses performance to standard.

PREPARATION DRILL

EXERCISE 3: HIGH JUMPER

Purpose: This exercise reinforces correct jumping and landing, stimulates balance and coordination, and develops explosive strength (Figure 6-60).

Starting Position: Forward leaning stance.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Swing arms forward and jump a few inches.
  2. Swing arms backward and jump a few inches.
  3. Swing arms forward vigorously overhead while jumping forcefully.
  4. Repeat count 2. On the last repetition, return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, the shoulders, the knees, and the balls of the feet should form a straight vertical line.
  • On count 1, the arms are parallel to the ground.
  • On count 3, the arms should be extended fully overhead. The trunk and legs should also be aligned.
  • On each count the Soldier is jumping. On counts 1, 2, and 4 the jumps are 4-6 inches off the ground. On count 3, the Soldier jumps higher (6-10 inches) while maintaining the posture pictured in Figure 6-60.
  • On each landing, the feet should be directed forward and maintained at shoulder distance apart. The landing should be ―soft‖ and proceed from the balls of the feet to the heels. The vertical line from the shoulders through the knees to the balls of the feet should be demonstrated on each landing.

Precautions: N/A

PREPARATION DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 3: MODIFIED HIGH JUMPER

6-117. The instructor may modify the high jumper by decreasing the range of motion and limiting the use of the arms. The Soldier may use the modifications shown in Figure 6-61 to exercise within physical profile limitations. The Soldier gradually increases the range of motion and works toward the standard execution of the exercise, then progresses performance to standard.

PREPARATION DRILL

EXERCISE 4: ROWER

Purpose: This exercise improves the ability to move in and out of the supine position to a seated posture. It coordinates the action of the trunk and extremities while challenging the abdominal muscles (Figure 6-62).

Starting Position: Supine position, arms overhead and feet together, and pointing upward. The chin is tucked and the head is 1-2 inches above the ground. Arms are shoulder-width, palms facing inward, with fingers and thumbs extended and joined.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Sit up while swinging arms forward and bending at the hip and knees. At the end of the motion, the arms will be parallel to ground, palms facing inward.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, the low back must not be arched excessively off the ground. To prevent this, tighten the abdominal muscles to tilt the pelvis and low back toward the ground.
  • At the end of counts 1 and 3, the feet are flat and pulled near the buttocks. The legs stay together throughout the exercise and the arms are parallel to the ground.

Precautions: This exercise is always performed at a slow cadence. Do not arch the back to assume counts 1 and 3.

PREPARATION DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 4: MODIFIED ROWER

6-118. The instructor may modify the rower by decreasing the range of motion or limiting the use of the arms. The Soldier may use the modifications shown in Figure 6-63 and Figure 6-64 to exercise within physical profile limitations. The Soldier gradually increases the range of motion and works toward the standard execution of the exercise, then progresses performance to standard.


PREPARATION DRILL

EXERCISE 5: SQUAT BENDER

Purpose: This exercise develops strength, endurance, and mobility of the lower back and lower extremities (Figure 6-65).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with hands on hips.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Squat while leaning slightly forward at the waist with the head up and extend the arms to the front, with arms parallel to the ground and palms facing inward.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Bend forward and reach toward the ground with both arms extended and palms inward.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the end of count 1, the shoulders, knees and the balls of the feet should be aligned. The heels remain on the ground and the back is straight.
  • On count 3, bend forward, keeping the head aligned with the spine and the knees slightly bent. Attempt to keep the back flat and parallel to the ground.

Precautions: This exercise is always performed at a slow cadence. Allowing the knees to go beyond the toes on count 1 increases stress to the knees.

PREPARATION DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 5: MODIFIED SQUAT BENDER

6-119. The instructor may modify the squat bender by decreasing the range of motion and limiting the use of the arms. The Soldier may use the modifications shown in Figure 6-66 to exercise within physical profile limitations. The Soldier gradually increases the range of motion and works toward the standard execution of the exercise, then progresses performance to standard.

PREPARATION DRILL

EXERCISE 6: WINDMILL

Purpose: This exercise develops the ability to safely bend and rotate the trunk. It conditions the muscles of the trunk, legs, and shoulders (Figure 6-67).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with arms sideward, palms facing down, fingers and thumbs extended and joined.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Bend the hips and knees while rotating to the left. Reach down and touch the outside of the left foot with the right hand and look toward the rear. The left arm is pulled rearward to maintain a straight line with the right arm.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1 to the right.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • From the starting position, feet are straight ahead, arms are parallel to the ground, hips set, and abdominals are tight.
  • On counts 1 and 3, ensure that the knees bend during the rotation. Head and eyes are directed to the rear on counts 1 and 3.

Precautions: This exercise is always performed at a slow cadence.

PREPARATION DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 6: MODIFIED WINDMILL

6-120. The instructor may modify the windmill by decreasing the range of motion and limiting the use of the arms. The modifications to the windmill shown in Figures 6-68, 6-69, and 6-70 may be used to exercise within physical profile limitations and gradually progress performance to standard.



PREPARATION DRILL

EXERCISE 7: FORWARD LUNGE

Purpose: This exercise promotes balance and develops leg strength (Figure 6-71).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with hands on hips.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Take a step forward with the left leg (the left heel should be 3-6 inches forward of the right foot). Lunge forward, lowering the body and allow the left knee to bend until the thigh is parallel to the ground. Lean slightly forward, keeping the back straight.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1 with the right leg.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Keep the abdominal muscles tight throughout the motion.
  • On counts 1 and 3, step straight forward, keeping the feet directed forward. When viewed from the front, the feet maintain their distance apart both at the starting position and at the end of counts 1 and 3.
  • On counts 1 and 3, the rear knee may bend naturally, but does not touch the ground. The heel of the rear foot should be off the ground.

Precautions: This exercise is always performed at a slow cadence. On counts 1 and 3, move into position in a controlled manner. Spring off of the forward leg to return to the starting position. This avoids jerking the trunk to create momentum.

PREPARATION DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 7: MODIFIED FORWARD LUNGE

6-121. The instructor may modify the forward lunge by decreasing the range of motion. As with all lunges, this one may restrict knee bend. The Soldier may keep the feet closer together than with the forward lunge. The Soldier concentrates on trying to gradually lower the body in the lunge position (Figure 6-72). Over time, the Soldier gradually increases his range of motion and works toward standard execution of the exercise.

PREPARATION DRILL

EXERCISE 8: PRONE ROW

Purpose: This exercise develops strength of the back and shoulders (Figure 6-73).

Starting Position: Prone position with the arms overhead, palms facing downward 1-2 inches off the ground, and toes pointed to the rear.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Raise the head and chest slightly while lifting the arms and pulling them rearward. Hands make fists as they move toward the shoulders.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, the abdominal muscles are tight and the head is aligned with the spine.
  • On counts 1 and 3, the forearms are parallel to the ground and slightly higher than the trunk.
  • On counts 1 and 3, the head is raised to look forward but not skyward.
  • Throughout the exercise, the legs and toes remain in contact with the ground.

Precautions: This exercise is always performed at a slow cadence. Prevent overarching of the back by maintaining contractions of the abdominal and buttocks muscles throughout the exercise.

PREPARATION DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 8: MODIFIED PRONE ROW

6-122. The instructor may modify the prone row by decreasing the range of motion and limiting the use of the arms. The Soldier assumes the starting position using his hands to assist in lowering the body, and then steps back into the six-point stance before lowering the body to the ground. He uses the modifications shown in Figures 6-74 and 6-75 to exercise within physical profile limitations. The Soldier works toward standard execution of the exercise.


PREPARATION DRILL

EXERCISE 9: BENT-LEG BODY TWIST

Purpose: This exercise strengthens trunk muscles and promotes control of trunk rotation (Figure 6-76).

Starting Position: Supine position with the hips and knees bent to 90 degrees, arms sideward, palms down with fingers spread. Knees and feet are together.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Rotate the legs to the left while keeping the upper back and arms in place.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1 to the right.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Tighten the abdominal muscles in the starting position and maintain this contraction throughout the exercise.
  • The head should be off the ground with the chin slightly tucked.
  • Ensure that the hips and knees maintain 90-degree angles.
  • Keep the feet and knees together throughout the exercise.
  • Attempt to rotate the legs to about 8-10 inches off the ground. The opposite shoulder must remain in contact with the ground.

Precautions: This exercise is always performed at a slow cadence. Do not rotate the legs to a point beyond which the arms and shoulders can no longer maintain contact with the ground.

PREPARATION DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 9: MODIFIED BENT-LEG BODY TWIST

6-123. The starting position for this exercise is the supine position with the arms sideward or at 45 degrees to the body (IAW profile limitations). Palms should face downward and knees bent at 90 degrees, with the feet flat on the floor. The head may be on the ground or elevated 1-2 inches depending on profile limitations. The Soldier assumes the starting position as in the bent-leg body twist, leaving the feet flat on the ground. (Figures 6-77 and 6-78).


PREPARATION DRILL

EXERCISE 10: PUSH-UP

Purpose: This exercise strengthens the muscles of the chest, shoulders, arms, and trunk (Figure 6-79).
Starting Position: Front leaning rest position.
Cadence: MODERATE
Count:

  1. Bend the elbows, lowering the body until the upper arms are parallel with the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • The hands are directly below the shoulders with fingers spread (middle fingers point straight ahead).
  • On counts 1 and 3 the upper arms stay close to the trunk, elbows pointing rearward.
  • On counts 2 and 4 the elbows straighten, but do not lock.
  • The trunk should not sag. To prevent this, tighten the abdominal muscles while in the starting position and maintain this contraction throughout the exercise.

Precautions: N/A

Variation: Soldiers should assume the six-point stance on their knees when unable to perform repetitions correctly to cadence (Figure 6-80).

PREPARATION DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 10: MODIFIED PUSH-UP

6-124. The Soldier performs the modified push-up in the six-point stance. The Soldier assumes the starting position, using his hands to assist in lowering his body, and then steps back into the six-point stance. Range of movement may be limited throughout the exercise. Over time, the Soldier gradually increases the range of motion and works toward the standard execution of the push-up (Figures 6-81 and 6-82).


CONDITIONING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 1: POWER JUMP

Purpose: This exercise reinforces correct jumping and landing, stimulates balance and coordination, and develops explosive strength (Figure 6-83).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with hands on hips.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Squat with the heels flat as the spine rounds forward to allow the straight arms to reach to the ground, touching with the palms of the hands.
  2. Jump forcefully in the air, vigorously raising arms overhead with palms facing inward.
  3. Control the landing and repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk.
  • On counts 1 and 3, keep the back generally straight with the head up and the eyes forward.
  • On count 2 the arms should be extended fully overhead. The trunk and legs should also be aligned.
  • On each landing, the feet should be directed forward and maintained at shoulder distance apart. The landing should be ―soft‖ and proceed from the balls of the feet to the heels. The vertical line from the shoulders through the knees to the balls of the feet should be demonstrated on each landing.

Precaution: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

MODIFIED EXERCISE 1: MODIFIED POWER JUMP

6-125. The instructor may modify the power jump by decreasing the range of motion or limiting the use of the arms. The Soldier may use the modifications shown in Figure 6-84 to exercise within physical profile limitations. The Soldier works toward standard execution of the exercise.

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 2: V-UP

Purpose: This exercise develops the abdominal and hip flexor muscles while enhancing balance (Figure 6-85).

Starting Position: Supine, arms on ground 45-degrees to the side, palms down with fingers spread. The chin is tucked and the head is 1-2 inches off the ground.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Raise straight legs and trunk to form a V-position, using arms as needed.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominal muscles to tilt the pelvis and the lower back toward the ground.
  • On counts 1 and 3, the knees and trunk are straight with the head aligned with the trunk.
  • On counts 2 and 4, lower the legs to the ground in a controlled manner so as not to injure the feet.

Precautions: To protect the spine, do not jerk the legs and trunk to rise to the V-position.

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

MODIFIED EXERCISE 2: MODIFIED V-UP

6-126. The starting position for this exercise is the supine position with the arms sideward or at 45 degrees to the body (IAW profile limitations). Palms are downward and knees are bent at 90 degrees with the feet flat on the floor. The head may be on the ground or elevated 1-2 inches off the ground IAW profile limitations. The Soldier assumes the starting position as in the V-up, using the hands as needed to lower the body to the ground. The head is elevated while the back and feet are flat on the ground. On counts 1 and 3, the Soldier lifts the feet off the ground, pulling the knees toward the chest. Then the Soldier lowers the feet to the ground, returning to the starting position on counts 2 and 4 (refer to Figure 6-86). Over time, the Soldier gradually increases the range of motion and works to perform the V-up to standard.

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 3: MOUNTAIN CLIMBER

Purpose: This exercise develops the ability to quickly move the legs to power out of the front leaning rest position (Figure 6-87).

Starting Position: Front leaning rest position with the left foot below the chest and between the arms.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Push upward with the feet and quickly change positions of the legs.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat the movements in count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Place the hands directly below the shoulders, fingers spread (middle fingers point straight ahead) with the elbows straight, not locked.
  • To prevent the trunk from sagging, tighten the abdominal muscles and maintain this contraction throughout the exercise. Do not raise the hips when moving throughout the exercise.
  • Align the head with the spine and keep the eyes directed to a point about two feet in front of the body.
  • Throughout the exercise, stay on the balls of the feet.
  • Move the legs straight forward and backward, not at angles.

Precautions: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

MODIFIED EXERCISE 3: MODIFIED MOUNTAIN CLIMBER

6-127. The instructor may modify the mountain climber by decreasing the range of motion. The Soldier assumes the starting position, stepping back as in the modified push-up. The Soldier may use the modifications shown in Figure 6-88 to exercise within physical profile limitations. The Soldier gradually increases the range of motion and works toward the standard execution of the exercise, then progresses performance to standard.

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 4: LEG-TUCK AND TWIST

Purpose: This exercise develops trunk strength and mobility while enhancing balance (Figure 6-89).

Starting Position: Seated with trunk straight but leaning backward 45 degrees, arms straight and hands on ground 45 degrees to the rear, palms down. Legs are straight, extended to the front and 8-12 inches off the ground.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Raise the legs while rotating on to the left buttock and draw the knees toward the left shoulder.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1 in the opposite direction.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk.
  • On all counts, keep the feet and knees together.
  • On counts 1 and 3, keep the head and trunk still as the legs move.

• On counts 1 and 3, tuck (bend) the legs and align them diagonal to the trunk. Precautions: To protect the back on counts 1 and 3, do not jerk the legs and trunk to achieve the end position.

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

MODIFIED EXERCISE 4: MODIFIED LEG-TUCK AND TWIST

Starting Position: The starting position for this exercise is the seated position with the arms sideward or at 45 degrees to the body (IAW profile limitations). Place the palms down and bend the knees 90 degrees. Keep the feet flat on the floor. Assume the starting position as in the leg-tuck and twist, but with the feet flat on the ground.

Count: On counts 1 and 3, lift the feet off the ground and rotate to the left or right side, pulling the knees toward the chest. Lower the feet to the ground, returning to the starting position on counts 2 and 4 (Figure 6-90). Over time, gradually increase the range of motion and work toward the standard execution of the leg-tuck and twist.

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 5: SINGLE-LEG PUSH-UP

Purpose: This exercise strengthens muscles of the chest, shoulders, arms, and trunk. Raising one leg while maintaining proper trunk position makes this an excellent trunk stabilizing exercise (Figure 6-91).

Starting Position: Front leaning rest position.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Bend the elbows, lowering the body until the upper arms are parallel with the ground while raising the left leg 8 to 10 inches off the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1, bringing the right leg to 8 to 10 inches off the ground.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Perform a squat thrust to move into the front leaning rest, and keep the body straight from head to heels. Support the body weight on the hands and the balls of the feet.
  • Extend the fingers and spread them so the middle fingers point straight ahead and are directly aligned with the shoulders.
  • On counts 1 and 3, the upper arms stay close to the trunk.
  • On counts 2 and 4, straighten, but do not lock, the elbows.
  • On counts 1 and 3, keep the raised leg straight and aligned with the trunk.
  • The trunk must not sag. To prevent this, tighten the abdominal muscles while in the starting position and maintain this contraction throughout the exercise.

Precautions: Do not jerk the leg to be raised past straight alignment with the trunk, as this may place undue stress on the back.

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

MODIFIED EXERCISE 5: MODIFIED SINGLE-LEG PUSH-UP

6-128. The single-leg push-up is modified by performing the modified push-up in the six-point stance. The Soldier assumes the starting position using the hands to assist in lowering the body, and then stepping back into the six-point stance (Figure 6-92). Range of movement may be limited throughout the exercise. The Soldier gradually increases the range of motion (Figure 6-93) and works toward the standard execution of the exercise, then progresses performance to standard.


MILITARY MOVEMENT DRILL 1 EXERCISE MODIFICATIONS

6-129. During level II resume MMD 1 by reducing the distance from 25 to 15 yards and ensure the Soldier limits the speed and intensity of movement.

  • For verticals, start with minimal air time and gradually progress to more powerful movements.
  • For laterals this means decreasing the crouch and stepping movements instead of maintaining the normal tempo.
  • The shuttle sprint is often restricted by profile. When conducting the shuttle sprint, ensure that the Soldier is able to negotiate the turns at walking speed before allowing him to run. In the post-profile period, resume the shuttle sprint without touching the hand to the ground on turns, and then gradually work toward bending enough to touch the ground.

RECOVERY DRILL EXERCISE MODIFICATIONS

6-130. The five exercises that comprise recovery include a wide range of movements that require structural strength, stability, flexibility, and mobility while using standing, seated, prone, and supine postures supported by one or both upper or lower limbs. Allow Soldiers to use their hands as needed to move into and out of starting and exercise positions on the ground. In the post-profile period, range of motion for some exercises may still be limited. Each of the five exercises may be modified to accommodate various physical limitations and gradually progress each exercise to standard.

RECOVERY DRILL

EXERCISE 1: OVERHEAD ARM PULL

Purpose: This exercise develops flexibility of the arms, shoulders, and trunk muscles (Figure 6-94).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with hands on hips.

Position 1: On the command, ―Ready, STRETCH,‖ raise the left arm overhead and place the left hand behind the head. Grasp above the left elbow with the right hand and pull to the right, leaning the body to the right. Hold this position for 20-30 seconds.

Starting Position: On the command, ―Starting Position, MOVE,‖ assume the starting position.

Position 2: On the command, ―Change Position, Ready, STRETCH,‖ raise the right arm overhead and place the right hand behind the head. Grasp above the right elbow with the left hand and pull to the left, leaning the body to the left. Hold this position for 20-30 seconds. On the command, ―Starting Position, MOVE,‖ return to the starting position.

Check Points:

• Throughout the exercise, keep the hips set and the abdominals tight.

• In positions 1 and 2, lean the body straight to the side, not to the front or back. Precautions: N/A

RECOVERY DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 1: MODIFIED OVERHEAD ARM PULL

6-131. The instructor may modify this exercise by decreasing the range of motion. The Soldier reaches overhead and then grasps the wrist with the opposite hand instead of the elbow (Figure 6-95). Another modification is to pull the arm across the front of the chest.

RECOVERY DRILL

EXERCISE 2: REAR LUNGE

Purpose: This exercise develops mobility of the hip flexors and trunk muscles (Figure 6-96).

Starting Position: Straddle stance, hands on hips.

Position 1: On the command, ―Ready, STRETCH,‖ take an exaggerated step backward with the left leg, touching down with the ball of the foot. This is the same position as count 1 of the rear lunge in CD 1. Hold this position for 20-30 seconds.

Starting Position: On the command, ―Starting Position, MOVE,‖ assume the starting position.

Position 2: On the command, ―Change Position, Ready, STRETCH,‖ take an exaggerated step backward with the right leg, touching down with the ball of the foot. This is the same position as count 3 of the rear lunge in CD 1. Hold this position for 20-30 seconds. On the command, ―Starting Position, MOVE,‖ return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Maintain straightness of the back by keeping the abdominal muscles tight throughout the motion.
  • After the foot touches down on positions 1 and 3, allow the body to continue to lower.
  • Lunge and step in a straight line, keeping the feet directed forward. Viewed from the front, the feet are shoulder width apart, both at the starting position and at the end of counts 1 and 3.
  • Keep the forward knee over the ball of the foot on counts 1 and 3.

Precautions: When lunging to the left or right, do not let the knee move forward of the toes.

RECOVERY DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 2: MODIFIED REAR LUNGE

6-132. The instructor can modify the rear lunge by decreasing the range of motion (Figure 6-97). As with all lunges, this one might restrict how far the knee can bend. The Soldier may place his feet closer together than with the rear lunge. The Soldier gradually lowers the body into the lunge position. Over time, the Soldier gradually increases the range of motion and works toward the standard execution of each exercise.

RECOVERY DRILL

EXERCISE 3: EXTEND AND FLEX

Purpose: This exercise develops mobility of the hip flexors, abdominals, hip (position 1-extend, Figure 6-98) and the low back, hamstrings, and calves (position 2-flex, Figure 6-98).

Starting Position: The front leaning rest position.

Position 1: On the command, ―Ready, STRETCH,‖ lower the body, sagging in the middle, keeping the arms straight and looking upward. Hold this position for 20-30 seconds.

Starting Position: On the command, ―Starting Position, MOVE,‖ assume the starting position.

Position 2: On the command, ―Change Position, READY, STRETCH,‖ slightly bend the knees and raise the hips upward. Straighten the legs and attempt to touch the ground with the heels. Move the head in line with the arms, forming an A with the body. Keep the feet together and hold this position for 20-30 seconds. On the command, ―Starting Position, MOVE,‖ return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • In position 1, the thighs and pelvis rest on the ground. Relax the back muscles while bearing the body weight through the straight arms. Toes point to the rear.
  • In position 2, the legs are straight and the arms are shoulder width apart, palms down on the ground. Relax the shoulders and push to the rear with the hands, forming an ―A‖ with the body. Try not to round the shoulders.
  • Keep the feet together throughout the exercise.

Precaution: N/A

Variation: Soldiers who cannot extend the trunk in position 1 while keeping the arms straight and hips on the ground may assume the modified position 1 shown above.

RECOVERY DRILL

MODIFIED EXERCISE 3: MODIFIED EXTEND AND FLEX

6-133. The instructor may modify this exercise by using a standing (Figure 6-99) or prone position. The Soldier may assume the starting position for the extend and flex using the prone position. To do so, the Soldier steps back into the front leaning rest position (Figure 6-100) instead of performing a squat thrust. In the post-profile period, range of motion for some exercises may still be limited. Soldiers may modify the extend position by raising up their forearms instead of their hands or by laying prone with the arms alongside the body, palms up (Figure 6-101). Over time, the Soldier gradually increases the range of motion and works toward the standard execution of each exercise.



RECOVERY DRILL

EXERCISE 4: THIGH STRETCH

Purpose: This exercise develops flexibility of the front of the thigh and the hip flexor muscles (Figure 6-102).

Starting Position: Seated position, arms at sides and palms on the ground.

Position 1: On the command, ―Ready, STRETCH,‖ roll onto the right side and place the right forearm on the ground, perpendicular to the chest. With the right hand, make a fist on the ground with the thumb side up. Grasp the left ankle with the left hand and pull the left heel toward the buttocks and pull the entire leg rearward. Push the left thigh further to the rear with the heel of the right foot. Hold this position for 20-30 seconds.

Starting Position: On the command, ―Starting Position, MOVE,‖ assume the starting position.

Position 2: On the command, ―Change Position, Ready, STRETCH,‖ lay on the left side and place the left forearm on the ground, perpendicular to the chest. The left hand makes a fist on the ground with the thumb side up. Grasp the right ankle with the right hand and pull the right heel toward the buttocks and pull the entire leg rearward. Push the right thigh further to the rear with the heel of the left foot. Hold this position for 20-30 seconds. On the command, ―Starting Position, MOVE,‖ return to the starting position.

Check Points:

• Keep the abdominal muscles tight throughout this stretch in order to keep the trunk straight.

• Do not pull the heel forcefully to the buttock if there is discomfort in the knee joint. Precaution: N/A

RECOVERY DRILL MODIFIED EXERCISE 4: MODIFIED THIGH STRETCH

6-134. The instructor may modify the thigh stretch by decreasing the range of motion. The starting position may be assumed using the hands (Figure 103).

6-135. The knee bend may be restricted so pull the leg slightly toward the front. Over time, the Soldier gradually increases the range of motion and works toward the standard execution of each exercise. The Soldier may also perform this exercise in a kneeling position, assuming the starting position from the modified extend and flex (Figure 6-104).

RECOVERY DRILL

EXERCISE 5: SINGLE-LEG OVER

Purpose: This exercise develops flexibility of the hips and lower back muscles (Figure 6-105).

Starting Position: Supine position with arms sideward, palms down, and feet together.

Position 1: On the command, ―Ready, STRETCH,‖ turn the body to the right, bend the left knee to 90 degrees over the right leg, grasp the outside of the left knee with the right hand and pull toward the right. Hold this position for 20-30 seconds.

Starting Position: On the command, ―Starting Position, MOVE,‖ assume the starting position.

Position 2: On the command, ―Change Position, Ready, STRETCH,‖ turn the body to the left, bend the right knee to 90 degrees over the left leg, grasp the outside of the right knee with the left hand, and pull toward the left. Hold this position for 20-30 seconds. On the command, ―Starting Position, MOVE,‖ return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, the arms are directed to the sides at 90 degrees to the trunk; the fingers and thumbs are extended and joined.
  • In position 1, keep the left shoulder, arm, and hand on the ground.
  • In position 2, keep the right shoulder, arm, and hand on the ground.
  • Keep the head on the ground throughout the exercise.

Precaution: N/A

RECOVERY DRILL MODIFIED EXERCISE 5: MODIFIED SINGLE-LEG OVER

6-136. The starting position for this exercise is supine (Figure 6-106). The Soldier places the arms sideward at 45 degrees to the body, palms downward. The Soldier bends the knees to 90 degrees with the feet flat on the ground. The Soldier rotates the hips and lowers the knees toward the ground.

6-137. Before being discharged from level II and returning to unit PRT, Soldiers must meet the requirements shown in Table 6-5.

Summary Unit readiness is greatly affected by injuries, illness, and other medical conditions. The Army PRT program is safe and effective. Physical readiness training must challenge Soldiers without breaking them. Some injuries inevitably occur, but units that take measures to control injury risks will have fewer Soldiers on medical profile and more on duty to perform mission requirements. For Soldiers who suffer injuries or are recovering from illness or other medical conditions, effective reconditioning allows them to return to duty at or above their pre-injury level of individual physical readiness. This is what special conditioning programs are all about.

PART THREE

ACTIVITIES

This part discusses the conduct of PRT exercises, drills, and activities.


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