Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) FM 21-20 / TC 3-22.20 Training Info

TC 3-22.20 Chapter 7 – Execution of Training

PART THREE

ACTIVITIES

This part discusses the conduct of PRT exercises, drills, and activities.

Chapter 7

Execution of Training

The key to success in PRT execution is skillful leadership with trained AIs who employ command presence, command voice, and organized instruction in the extended rectangular formation. This chapter describes in detail the PRT commands, formations, positions, and counting cadence.

COMMANDS

7-1. This section discusses the importance of proper commands. This cannot be underestimated. Invariably, PRT performance reflects the quality of its commands. Indifferent commands produce indifferent performance. When a command is given distinctly, concisely, with energy, and with proper regard to rhythm, Soldier performance will reflect it. See FM 3-21.5, Drill and Ceremonies, for detailed information of command voice, posture, and presence.

TYPES

7-2. The two types of commands used in PRT are preparatory commands and commands of execution. The preparatory command describes and specifies what is required. All preparatory commands are given with rising voice inflection. The command of execution calls into action what has been prescribed. The interval between the two commands should be long enough to permit the Soldier to understand the first one before the second one is given.

COMMAND DELIVERY

7-3. When the PRT leader addresses the formation and is commanding movement or announcing the name of an exercise, he does so from the position of attention. Exceptions are exercises that change position without returning to the position of attention.

7-4. When exercises are performed, Soldiers assume the proper starting position of each exercise on the command ―Starting position, MOVE.‖ When conducting exercises, Soldiers are commanded to return to the position of attention from the terminating position of the exercise before they are commanded to assume the starting position for the next exercise. PRT leaders use the command ―Position of Attention, MOVE‖, to bring Soldiers to the position of attention from an exercise terminating position.

7-5. For example, this is how the PRT leader would conduct exercise 4, thigh stretch in the RD.

  • From the position of attention, the PRT leader commands, ―THETHIGH STRETCH.‖
  • Soldiers respond, ―THETHIGH STRETCH.‖
  • From the position of attention, the PRT leader commands, ―StartingPosition, MOVE.‖
  • The PRT leader and Soldiers assume the starting position for the thigh stretch.
  • From the starting position, the PRT leader commands, ―Ready, STRETCH.‖
  • To change position, the PRT leader first commands, ―StartingPosition, MOVE.‖
  • From the starting position, the PRT leader commands, ―Change Position, Ready, STRETCH.‖
  • Upon termination of the exercise, the PRT leader commands, ―StartingPosition, MOVE.‖
  • The PRT leader assumes the position of attention and commands, ―Position of Attention, MOVE.‖

EXTENDED RECTANGULAR FORMATION

7-6. The Army’s traditional formation for PRT activities is the extended rectangular formation. It is best for platoon-to company-size formations because it is simple and easy to assume.

PLATOON ASSEMBLY

7-7. The PRT leader will position a platoon-size unit in a line formation so that the unit is centered and five paces away from the PRT platform after they have assumed the rectangular formation. Refer to Figure 7-1. The PRT leader gives the following commands:

• ―Extend to the left, MARCH.‖ Soldiers in the right flank file stand fast with their left arm extended sideward with palms down, fingers and thumbs extended and joined. All other Soldiers turn to the left and double-time forward. After taking the sufficient number of steps, all Soldiers face the front and extend both arms sideward with palms down, fingers and thumbs extended and joined. The distance between fingertips is about 12 inches and dress is to the right.

• ―Arms downward, MOVE.‖ The Soldiers lower their arms smartly to their sides. Soldiers in the right flank file lower their left arms to their sides.

• ―Left, FACE.‖ Soldiers execute the left face.
• ―Extend to the left, MARCH.‖ Soldiers in the right flank file stand fast with their left arms extended

sideward with palms down, fingers and thumbs extended and joined. All other Soldiers turn to the left and double-time forward. After taking the sufficient number of steps, all Soldiers face the front and extend both arms sideward with palms down, fingers and thumbs extended and joined. The distance between fingertips is about 12 inches and dress is to the right.

• ―Arms downward, MOVE.‖ Soldiers lower their arms smartly to their sides. Soldiers in the right

flank file lower their left arms to their sides.

• ―Right, FACE.‖ Soldiers execute the right face.

• ―From front to rear, COUNT OFF.‖ The front Soldier in each column turns his head to the right rear, and then calls off, ―ONE,‖ and faces the front. Successive Soldiers in each column call off in turn ―TWO,‖ ―THREE,‖ ―FOUR,‖ and so on. The last Soldier in each column will not turn his head and eyes to the right while sounding off.

• ―Even number to the left, UNCOVER.‖ Even-numbered Soldiers side step to the left squarely in the center of the interval, bringing their feet together. (See Figure 7-2.)


PLATOON REASSEMBLY

7-8. To reassemble the formation, the PRT leader commands: ―Assemble to the Right, MARCH.‖ All Soldiers double-time to their original positions in the formation (Figure 7-1).

COMPANY IN LINE WITH PLATOONS IN COLUMN

7-9. The PRT leader will position a company-size unit in the extended rectangular formation from a company in line with platoons in column. He then adjusts the base platoon so that the company will be centered and five paces away from the PRT platform after they have assumed the rectangular formation. Refer to Figure 7-3. The PRT leader gives the commands specified in paragraph 7-7 to extend the formation (Figure 7-4).


7-10. To reassemble the formation, the PRT leader commands: ―Assemble to the Right, MARCH.‖ All Soldiers double-time to their original positions in the formation (Figure 7-3).

COMPANY FORMATION EN MASSE

7-11. The PRT leader will position a company-size unit in a rectangular formation. He first adjusts the base platoon so that the company will be centered and five paces away from the PRT platform after they have assumed the rectangular formation. Refer to Figure 7-5. The PRT leader gives the commands specified in paragraph 7-7 to extend the formation (Figure 7-6).


7-12. To reassemble the formation, the PRT leader commands: ―Assemble to the right, MARCH.‖ All Soldiers double-time to their original positions in the formation (Figure 7-5).

PLATOON EXTENDED RECTANGULAR FORMATION, COVERED

7-13. The formation for military movement and GDs is a platoon extended rectangular formation, covered (Figure 7-8). The PRT leader positions the platoon in a line formation so the unit will be centered and five paces away from the PRT platform after it assumes the extended rectangular formation. The PRT leader gives the following commands to extend the platoon formation covered (Figures 7-7 and 7-8).

• ―Extend to the left, MARCH.‖ Soldiers in the right flank file stand fast with their left arm extended sideward with palms down, fingers and thumbs extended and joined. All other Soldiers turn to the left and double-time forward. After taking the sufficient number of steps, all Soldiers face the front and extend both arms sideward with palms down, fingers and thumbs extended and joined. The distance between fingertips is about 12 inches and dress is to the right.

• ―Arms downward, MOVE.‖ The Soldiers lower their arms smartly to their sides. Soldiers in the right flank file lower their left arms to their sides.

• ―Left, FACE.‖ Soldiers execute the left face.

• ―Extend to the left, MARCH.‖ Soldiers in the right flank file stand fast with their left arms extended sideward with palms down, fingers and thumbs extended and joined. All other Soldiers turn to the left and double-time forward. After taking the sufficient number of steps, all Soldiers face the front and extend both arms sideward with palms down, fingers and thumbs extended and joined. The distance between fingertips is about 12 inches and dress is to the right.

• ―Arms downward, MOVE.‖ Soldiers lower their arms smartly to their sides. Soldiers in the right flank file lower their left arms to their sides.

• ―Right, FACE.‖ Soldiers execute the right face.


7-14. To reassemble the formation, the PRT leader commands: ―Assemble to the Right, MARCH.‖ All Soldiers double-time to their original positions in the formation (Figure 7-7).

POSITIONS

7-15. When a set of conditioning exercises is employed, Soldiers assume the proper starting position of each exercise on the command ―Starting Position, MOVE.‖ When conducting exercises, Soldiers are commanded to return to the position of attention from the terminating position of the exercise, before commanded to assume the starting position for the next exercise.

SQUAT POSITION

7-16. To assume the squat position from the position of attention, lower the body by bending the knees and place the hands with palms down and fingers spread, shoulder width in front of the body, and in between the bent legs. Raise the heels, supporting the body weight on the balls of the feet and hands. Direct the head and the eyes to a point about three to four feet in front of the body (Figure 7-9).

FRONT LEANING REST POSITION

7-17. The Soldier assumes the front leaning rest position by performing two movements. First, the Soldier moves from the position of attention to the squat position, then thrusts the feet backward to the front leaning rest position. If he has trouble with the squat thrust, he can step back with his left leg—then with his right leg—to get into the front leaning rest position. In the front leaning rest position, maintain straight body alignment from his head to his heels. He supports his body weight on his hands (shoulder width) and on the balls of his feet. He keeps his feet and legs together (Figure 7-10).

SIX-POINT STANCE

7-18. Assume the six-point stance by dropping to the knees from the front leaning rest position. Maintain a straight line from the head to the knees (Figure 7-11).

STRADDLE STANCE

7-19. Assume the straddle stance position by standing with the feet straight ahead and aligned with the shoulders (Figure 7-12).

FORWARD LEANING STANCE

7-20. Assume the forward leaning stance by bending the trunk forward 45 degrees, knees bent 45 degrees, with the heels flat on the ground, and the feet aligned with the shoulders. Keep the back straight, maintaining a straight line from the head to the hips (Figure 7-13).

PRONE POSITION

7-21. Assume the prone position by performing three movements: 1) From the position of attention, move to the squat position, 2) thrust the feet backward to the front leaning rest position, and then 3) lower the body slowly to the ground. Keep the elbows close to the body and pointed directly to the rear (Figure 7-14).

SUPINE POSITION

7-22. To assume the supine position without using the hands, from the standing position, place one foot behind the other and slowly lower the body until the rear knee touches the ground. Sit back onto the buttocks and then lay on the back with feet and legs together (Figure 7-15). When returning to the standing position, sit up and rock forward on one knee. From this position, step up with the other leg and stand without using the hands for assistance (Figure 7-16).

7-23. If the Soldier has difficulty assuming this position, he can place his hands on the ground as he slowly lower his body to the seated position (Figure 7-16). If he cannot attain the standing position without using his hands, he can place them on the ground to either side of his body and push up while standing from the seated position. To return to a standing position from the supine position, he performs the actions in reverse order (Figure 7-15).

CADENCE

7-24. The following paragraphs discuss cadence speed and conduct of exercises.

SPEED

7-25. Cadence speed is described as SLOW or MODERATE. The speed of each cadence is listed below:

  • SLOW–50 counts per minute.
  • MODERATE–80 counts per minute.

EXERCISE NAME

7-26. Once Soldiers have learned the names of the exercises, the PRT leader merely needs to say the exercise name, command the Soldiers to assume the starting position and start them exercising to cadence. For example, this is how the PRT leader begins exercise 1 of preparation, bend, and reach to cadence:

  • The PRT leaders states, ―the Bend and Reach.‖
  • The Soldiers respond, ―the Bend and Reach.‖
  • The PRT leader commands, ―Starting Position, MOVE‖ (Soldiers assume the starting position).
  • The PRT leader commands, ―In Cadence (Soldiers respond, ―In Cadence‖), EXERCISE.‖
  • The command, ―EXERCISE‖ initiates movement to the position of count 1.

7-27. The previous command sequence is also used in the conduct of preparation, recovery, CD, and CL exercises.

7-28. Counting cadence ensures that exercises are performed at the appropriate speed. The cadence count indicates termination of movement to each position. The cumulative count is a method of indicating the number of repetitions of an exercise on the fourth count of a 4-count exercise. The use of the cumulative count is required for the following reasons:

  • It provides the PRT leader with an excellent method of counting the number of repetitions performed.
  • It serves as motivation. Soldiers like to know the number of repetitions they are expected to perform.
  • It prescribes an exact amount of exercise for any group.

COUNTS

7-29. This paragraph describes the conduct of cadence counts:

Two-Count Exercise

  • The PRT leader counts, ―Up, down.‖
  • The Soldiers respond, ―One.‖
  • The PRT leader counts, ―Up, down.‖
  • The Soldiers respond, ―Two.‖
  • The PRT leader counts, ―Up, down.‖
  • The Soldiers respond, ―Three,‖ and so forth.

Four-Count Exercise

  • The PRT leader counts, ―One, two, three.‖
  • The Soldiers respond, ―One.‖
  • The PRT leader counts, ―One, two, three.‖
  • The Soldiers respond, ―Two.‖
  • The PRT leader counts, ―One, two, three.‖
  • The Soldiers respond, ―Three,‖ and so forth.

Eight-Count Exercise

  • The PRT leader counts, ―One, two, three, four, five, six, seven.‖
  • The Soldiers respond, ―One.‖
  • The PRT leader counts, ―One, two, three, four, five, six, seven.‖
  • The Soldiers respond, ―Two.‖
  • The PRT leader counts, ―One, two, three, four, five, six, seven.‖
  • The Soldiers respond, ―Three,‖ and so forth.

Termination

7-30. To terminate an exercise, the PRT leader will raise the inflection of his voice while counting out the cadence of the last repetition. The Soldiers and PRT leader respond with ―HALT‖ upon returning to the starting position.

Two-Count Exercise

  • The PRT leader counts, ―Up, down.‖
  • The Soldiers respond, ―Four.‖
  • The PRT leader counts ―Up, down‖ (with voice inflection).
  • The Soldiers and PRT leader respond, ―HALT.‖
  • The PRT leader commands ―DISMOUNT.‖
  • The Soldiers dismount the climbing bars.
  • The PRT leader commands ―Position of attention, MOVE.‖
  • The Soldiers assume the position of attention.

Four-Count Exercise

  • The PRT leader counts, ―One, two, three.‖
  • The Soldiers respond, ―Nine.‖
  • The PRT leader counts, ―One, two, three‖ (with voice inflection).
  • The Soldiers and PRT leader respond, ―HALT.‖
  • The PRT leader commands ―Position of attention, MOVE.‖
  • The Soldiers assume the position of attention.

Eight-Count Exercise

  • The PRT leader counts, ―One, two, three, four, five, six, seven.‖
  • The Soldiers respond, ―Four.‖
  • The PRT leader counts, ―One, two, three, four, five, six, seven‖ (with voice inflection on counts five, six, and seven).
  • The Soldiers and PRT leader respond, ―HALT.‖
  • The PRT leader commands, ―Position of attention, MOVE.‖
  • The Soldiers assume the position of attention.

COMMANDS

7-31. The PD consists of ten four-count calisthenic exercises. See paragraph 7-29 for the commands, counting, and cadence instructions used to conduct preparation. Each strength and mobility drill has its own set of commands.

GUERRILLA DRILL

7-32. The GD includes three exercises that are performed from the extended rectangular formation, covered. The commands are followed when performing the shoulder roll, lunge walk, and Soldier carry. The difference for the Soldier carry is that Soldiers change positions at the 25-yard mark and return to the start point. When the PRT leader commands, ―the Shoulder Roll,‖ the entire formation repeats, ―Shoulder Roll.‖ After this, the leader need not say or repeat the command. The first rank takes one step forward with their left foot, but remains at attention:

  • On the command, ―READY,‖ the first rank moves into the starting position.
  • On the command, ―GO,‖ the first rank begins the movement.

7-33. In a typical formation with four ranks, the PRT leader directs the front rank remaining in the formation to move forward. He does this immediately after the previous front rank start the movement. The other ranks remain in place, awaiting further instructions. To do this, the PRT leader commands ―Next Rank, MOVE FORWARD.‖ Once the rank conducting the movement is about 12 yards into the exercise, the PRT leader commands, ―Ready,‖ and the rank moves into the starting position. Immediately after all Soldiers are in the starting position, the leader commands, ―GO.‖ He repeats this sequence of commands until all ranks have performed the shoulder roll. Perform the GD in platoon-size or smaller formations (extended and covered). This provides the appropriate work-to-rest ratio of 1:3. If he has less than four ranks for this drill, he enforces a 1:3 work-to-rest ratio.

CONDITIONING DRILLS

7-34. Conditioning drills have four-count and eight-count exercises.

CLIMBING DRILLS

7-35. Climbing drills have two-count exercises.

MILITARY MOVEMENT DRILLS

7-36. Military movement drills 1 and 2 each have three exercises that are performed from the extended rectangular formation, covered. The commands listed below will be followed when performing verticals, laterals, the shuttle sprint, the power skip, crossovers, and the crouch run. During the shuttle sprint, Soldiers will run the first two 25-yard intervals at the pace of the squad leader, then sprint the last 25-yard interval at their own pace. During the crouch run, on the command ―Ready,‖ Soldiers move to the starting position of the mountain climber. On the command ―GO,‖ Soldiers perform counts 1, 2, and 3 of the mountain climber, then upon finishing count four run forward in the crouch position to the 25-yard mark.

7-37. For movement drills, the PRT leader states, ―verticals‖ (and the entire formation repeats ―verticals‖). After this, there is no need to say or repeat ―verticals.‖ The first rank takes one step forward with their left foot, but remains at the position of attention.

  • On the command, ―Ready,‖ the first rank moves into the starting position.
  • On the command, ―GO,‖ the first rank begins the movement.

7-38. In a typical formation with four ranks, the PRT leader will have the front rank remaining in the formation move forward. He does this immediately after the previous front rank starts the movement. The other ranks should remain in place, awaiting further instructions. To accomplish this, the PRT leader commands ―Next Rank, MOVE FORWARD.‖ Once the rank conducting the movement is about 12 yards into the exercise, the PRT leader commands, ―Ready,‖ and then the rank moves into the starting position. Immediately after all Soldiers are in the starting position, the leader commands, ―GO.‖ The PRT leader repeats this sequence of commands until all ranks have performed verticals. Perform the military movement drill in platoon-size or smaller formations (extended and covered). This provides the appropriate work-to-rest ration of 1:3. If there are less than four ranks, the leader ensures that a 1:3 work-to-rest ratio is followed during military movement drills.

RUNNING ACTIVITIES

7-39. Running activities have different sets of commands. Sustained running begins when the PRT leader states, ―double time, MARCH,‖ and terminates the run with the commands, ―Quick Time, MARCH.‖ The PRT leader begins each repetition with the commands, ―Ready, GO,‖ when conducting HR and the 300-yd SR.

7-40. When conducting 30:60s or 60:120s, the PRT leader begins the activity with slow jogging for ¼-mile on the commands of ―Double Time, MARCH,‖ and terminates the ¼-mile run with the commands, ―Quick Time, MARCH.‖ 30:60s and 60:120s begin with the PRT leader signaling the start of each work interval (30 or 60 seconds) with one short whistle blast. Two short whistle blasts are used to signal the end of each work interval and the start of the rest intervals (60 or 120 seconds). Upon completion of the scheduled number of repetitions of 30:60s or 60:120s, the PRT leader will command the formation to continue to walk for at least three minutes before performing additional activities or the RD. The PRT leader will use the same commands specified for the shuttle sprint in MMD1 when conducting the 300-yard SR. The only difference is that Soldiers will perform six 50-yard repetitions to complete 300 yards.

RECOVERY DRILL

7-41. The RD exercises require no verbal cadence. Soldiers move in and out of the starting position and each exercise position on the PRT leader’s commands. Soldiers hold each exercise position for 20 seconds in the toughening phase and 20-30 seconds in the sustaining phase during recovery. The leader does not count the seconds aloud. This is how he conducts recovery exercise 1, overhead arm pull:

  • The PT leader commands, ―THE OVERHEAD ARM PULL.‖ Each Soldier responds, ―THE OVERHEAD ARM PULL.‖
  • The PRT leader commands, ―Starting Position, MOVE.‖ Each Soldier moves into the starting position, straddle stance with hands on hips.
  • The command to begin the stretch is, ―Ready, STRETCH.‖ Each Soldier raises his left arm overhead and places his left hand behind his head and grasps above his left elbow with his right hand. He then pulls to the right, leaning his body to the right. He holds this position for 20-30 seconds.
  • The PRT leader commands, ―Starting Position, MOVE.‖ Each Soldier moves into the starting position.
  • The PRT leader gives the command to stretch the other side of the body: ―Change Position, Ready, STRETCH.‖ Each Soldier raises his right arm overhead and places his right hand behind his head and grasps above his right elbow with his left hand. He then pulls to his left, leaning his body to the left. He holds this position for 20-30 seconds.
  • The PRT leader commands, ―Starting Position, MOVE.‖ Each Soldier assumes the starting position.
  • The PRT leader assumes the position of attention and commands, ―Position of Attention, MOVE.‖ Each Soldier assumes the position of attention.

MIRROR EFFECT

7-42. When leading an exercise in front of the formation, the PRT leader begins the movements in count 1 to

the right. He continues to mirror the Soldier’s movements while facing them throughout the exercise.

Summary Successful execution of PRT depends on the leadership of competent instructors and AIs. PRT leaders must have more than the knowledge, skills, and abilities to execute a PRT session. They must also present a positive image of physical fitness.


1 Comment for this entry

  • jeff

    When you are extended and the next drill is MMD1 or MMD2 do you say assemble to the right? Or do you say even numbers to the left recover? If so what reg covers that?

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