Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) FM 21-20 / TC 3-22.20 Training Info

TC 3-22.20 Chapter 9 – Strength and Mobility Activities

Chapter 9

Strength and Mobility Activities

“The race is to the swift; the battle to the strong.”

John Davidson, 19th Century Poet

This chapter describes strength and mobility exercises, drills, and activities designed for Soldiers in the toughening and sustaining phases of PRT. The purpose of strength and mobility activities is to improve functional strength, postural alignment, and body mechanics as they relate to the performance of WTBDs.

EXERCISE DRILLS

9-1. The regular and precise execution of strategically organized and sequenced exercise drills will develop the body management competencies needed to successfully accomplish WTBDs (Figure 9-1). Table 9-1 describes all strength and mobility drills and activities presented in this chapter. Table 9-2 describes strength and mobility drills and activities and the prescription of intensity, duration, and volume within the toughening and sustaining phases. In addition, Chapter 5, Planning Considerations, provides the template for commanders and PRT leaders to implement strength and mobility activities into their PRT programs.

Table 9-1. Strength and mobility drills and activities

Conditioning Drill 1 (CD 1) Conditioning Drill 1 consists of basic and intermediate calisthenic exercises that develop foundational fitness and body management by challenging strength, endurance, and mobility through complex functional movement patterns.
Conditioning Drill 2 (CD 2) Conditioning Drill 2 consists of intermediate and advanced calisthenic exercises that are designed to functionally train the total-body muscular strength and endurance needed to successfully perform WTBDs.
Conditioning Drill 3 (CD 3) Conditioning Drill 3 consists of advanced calisthenic and plyometric exercises that are designed to functionally train agility, coordination, and the lower-body muscular strength and endurance needed to successfully perform WTBDs.
Push-up and Sit-up Drill (PSD) The Push-up and Sit-up Drill consists of push-up and sit-up exercises performed in alternating timed sets (30 to 60 seconds each) to enhance upper-body muscular strength and endurance for improved APFT performance.
Climbing Drill 1 (CL 1) Climbing Drill 1 consists of exercises performed on a high bar or climbing bars. This drill develops upper body and trunk strength and mobility while manipulating body weight off the ground.
Climbing Drill 2 (CL 2) Climbing Drill 2 consists of exercises performed on a high bar or climbing bars. This drill improves upper body and trunk strength and mobility needed for manipulating body weight while under fighting load.
Strength Training Circuit (STC) The Strength Training Circuit consists of sequenced exercise stations using strength training equipment and climbing exercises performed for a designated time until all exercises have been performed. Movement and distance between exercise stations may be varied. In the sustaining phase, movement from station to station may include exercises from both military movement drills 1 and/or 2.
Guerrilla Drill (GD) The Guerrilla Drill consists of dynamic exercises that develop leg power and functional mobility. The emphasis is on improving combative techniques and the ability to carry/evacuate another Soldier.

Table 9-2. Strength and mobility activity prescription

Strength and Mobility Activities
Activities Toughening Phase (BCT & OSUT-R/W/B) Sustaining Phase (AIT & OSUT-B/G) Sustaining Phase ARFORGEN (Reset) Sustaining Phase ARFORGEN (Train/Ready) Sustaining Phase ARFORGEN (Available)
CD1 5 reps 5-10 reps 5-10 reps 5-10 reps 5-10 reps
CD2 5 reps 5-10 reps 5-10 reps 5-10 reps 5-10 reps
CD3 N/A 5-10 reps 5-10 reps 5-10 reps 5-10 reps
PSD 2 sets @ 30-60 sec 2-4 sets @ 30-60 sec 2-4 sets @ 30-60 sec 2-4 sets @ 30-60 sec 2-4 sets @ 30-60 sec
CL1 5 reps 5-10 reps 5-10 reps 5-10 reps 5-10 reps
CL2 N/A 5-10 reps w/load 5-10 reps w/load 5-10 reps w/load 5-10 reps w/load
STC 2-3 rotations@ 60 sec 2-3 rotations@ 60 sec 2-3 rotations@ 60 sec 2-3 rotations@ 60 sec 2-3 rotations@ 60 sec
GD N/A 1-3 reps 1-3 reps 1-3 reps 1-3 reps
Abbreviations CD1-Conditioning Drill 1 CD2-Conditioning Drill 2 CD3-Conditioning Drill 3 PSD-Push-up/Sit-up Drill CL1-Climbing Drill 1 CL2-Climbing Drill 2 STC-Strength Training Circuit GD-Guerrilla Drill

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

9-2. Conditioning drill 1 consists of five exercises that develop complex motor skills while challenging strength, endurance, and mobility at a high intensity. All of the exercises in the drill are conducted to cadence, and are always performed in the sequence listed. In the toughening phase, Soldiers should perform no more than five repetitions of each exercise in CD 1. In the sustaining phase, Soldiers progress from 5 to 10 repetitions. If more repetitions are desired, then perform an additional set of the entire drill. Precise execution should never be sacrificed for speed.

TRAINING AREA

9-3. Any level area of adequate size is satisfactory for conduct of CDs.

UNIFORM

9-4. Soldiers will wear the IPFU or ACUs and boots.

EQUIPMENT

9-5. N/A.

FORMATION

9-6. For the most efficient instruction, the ideal unit size is one platoon. Larger units up to a battalion can successfully perform these drills if properly taught and mastered at the small unit level. The extended rectangular formation is prescribed.

LEADERSHIP

9-7. A PRT leader and AI are required to instruct and lead CD 1. The instructor must be familiar with the method of teaching these exercises, commands, counting cadence, cumulative count, formations, starting positions, and use of AIs as described in Chapter 7, Execution of Training. Soldiers should memorize the exercises by name and movement. The exercises are always given in cadence. Soldiers begin and terminate each exercise at the starting position and move to the position of attention before beginning the next exercise. The goal is to complete the entire drill with only enough pauses between exercises for the instructor to indicate the next one by name. This continuous method of conducting CD 1 intensifies the workload and conserves time. Considerable time and effort must be expended during the early stages to teach exercises properly to all Soldiers. Teach and practice exercises using a slow cadence (50 counts per minute) until correct form in executing each exercise is achieved.

PRECISION

9-8. Conditioning drill exercises lose much of their value unless performed exactly as prescribed. Precision should never be compromised for quantity of repetitions or speed of movement. A cadence that is too fast will not allow Soldiers to achieve a full range of movement.

PROGRESSION

9-9. Soldiers perform no more than five repetitions of each exercise while learning and practicing CDs. In the toughening phase, CD 1 is performed for five repetitions of each exercise. In the sustaining phase, CD 1 is performed for 5 to 10 repetitions of each exercise. Do not exceed ten repetitions of each exercise. Instead, if more repetitions are desired, perform additional sets of the entire drill.

INTEGRATION

9-10. Conditioning drill 1 integrates the components of strength, endurance, and mobility. This drill builds strength by challenging the control of body weight and promotes endurance without the repetitive motions that often lead to overuse injuries. It also improves mobility by progressively moving the major joints through a full, controlled range of motion.

COMMANDS

9-11. Chapter 7 provides the commands for CD 1.

BODY SEGMENTS TRAINED

9-12. Conditioning drill 1 consists of five 4-count exercises that train the body segments listed in Table 9-3. Instructions for giving commands are listed in Chapter 7, Execution of Training.

Table 9-3. Body segments trained in the conduct of CD 1

CONDITIONING DRILL 1 (CD 1) MUSCLES
HIPS THIGHS LOWER LEGS CHEST BACK TRUNK SHOULDERS ARMS
1. POWER JUMP X X X X X X
2. V-UP X X X X X X X
3. MOUNTAIN CLIMBER X X X X X X X X
4. LEG TUCK AND TWIST X X X X X X X
5. SINGLE LEG PUSH-UP X X X X X X X X

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 1: POWER JUMP

Purpose: This exercise reinforces correct jumping and landing, stimulates balance and coordination, and develops explosive strength (Figure 9-2).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with hands on hips.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Squat with the heels flat as the spine rounds forward to allow the straight arms to reach to the ground, attempting to touch with the palms of the hands.
  2. Jump forcefully in the air, vigorously raising arms overhead, with palms facing inward.
  3. Control the landing and repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk.
  • On counts 1 and 3, keep the back generally straight with the head up and the eyes forward.
  • On count 2, the arms should be extended fully overhead. The trunk and legs should also be in line.
  • On each landing, the feet are directed forward and maintained at shoulder distance apart. The landing should be soft and proceed from the balls of the feet to the heels. The vertical line from the shoulders through the knees to the balls of the feet should be demonstrated on each landing.

Precaution: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 2: V-UP

Purpose: This exercise develops the abdominal and hip flexor muscles while enhancing balance (Figure 9-3).

Starting Position: Supine, arms on ground 45 degrees to the side, palms down. The chin is tucked and the head is 1 to 2 inches off the ground.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Raise straight legs and trunk to form a V-position, using arms as needed.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominal muscles to tilt the pelvis and the lower back toward the ground.
  • On counts 1 and 3, straighten the knees and trunk and align the head with the trunk.
  • On counts 2 and 4, lower the legs to the ground in a controlled manner so as not to injure the feet.

Precaution: To protect the spine, do not jerk the legs and trunk to rise to the V-position.

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 3: MOUNTAIN CLIMBER

Purpose: This exercise develops the ability to quickly move the legs to power out of the front leaning rest position (Figure 9-4).

Starting Position: Front leaning rest position with the left foot below the chest and between the arms.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Push upward with the feet and quickly change the positions of the legs.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat the movements in count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • The hands are directly below the shoulders with the fingers spread (middle fingers pointing straight ahead) with the elbows straight, not locked.
  • To prevent the trunk from sagging, contract and hold the abdominals throughout the exercise. Do not raise the hips and buttocks when moving throughout the exercise.
  • Align the head with the spine and direct the eyes to a point about two feet in front of the body.
  • Throughout the exercise, remain on the balls of the feet.
  • Move the legs straight forward and backward, not at angles.

Precaution: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 4: LEG TUCK AND TWIST

Purpose: This exercise develops trunk strength and mobility while enhancing balance (Figure 9-5).

Starting Position: Seated with trunk straight but leaning backward 45 degrees, arms straight and hands on ground 45 degrees to the rear with palms down. Legs are straight, extended to the front, and 8 to 12 inches off the ground.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Raise legs while rotating on to the left buttock and draw the knees toward the left shoulder.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1 in the opposite direction.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk.
  • On all counts, keep the legs and knees together.
  • On counts 1 and 3, the head and trunk remain still while the legs move.

• On counts 1 and 3, the legs are tucked (bent) and aligned diagonal to the trunk. Precaution: To protect the back on counts 1 and 3, avoid jerking the legs and trunk to achieve the end position.

CONDITIONING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 5: SINGLE-LEG PUSH-UP

Purpose: This exercise strengthens muscles of the chest, shoulders, arms, and trunk. Raising one leg while maintaining proper trunk position makes this an excellent trunk stabilizing exercise (Figure 9-6).

Starting Position: Front leaning rest position.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Bend the elbows, lowering the body until the upper arms are parallel with the ground while raising the left leg 8-10 inches off the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1, bringing the right leg to 8-10 inches off the ground.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Perform a squat thrust to move into the front leaning rest. Keep the body straight from head to heels. Support the body weight on the hands and balls of the feet.
  • The fingers should be extended and spread so the middle fingers point straight ahead and are directly in line with the shoulders.
  • On counts 1 and 3, the upper arms stay close to the trunk.
  • On counts 2 and 4, straighten but do not lock the elbows.
  • On counts 1 and 3, the raised leg is straight and aligned with the trunk.
  • To keep the trunk from sagging, tighten the abdominal muscles while in the starting position and maintain this contraction throughout the exercise.

Precautions: Do not jerk the leg being raised on counts 1 and 3. Also do not raise the leg higher than straight alignment with the trunk, as this may place undue stress on the back.

CONDITIONING DRILL 2

9-13. Conditioning drill 2 consists of five advanced exercises that require more complex plyometric and bilateral movement skills, while challenging the components of strength, endurance, and mobility (Table 9-4). Exercises are conducted at a slow (turn and lunge, supine bicycle, and swimmer) or moderate (half jacks and 8-count push-up) cadence. In the toughening phase, Soldiers should perform no more than five repetitions of each exercise in CD 2. In the sustaining phase, Soldiers progress from 5 to 10 repetitions. If more repetitions are desired, then perform an additional set of the entire drill. Precise execution should never be sacrificed for speed.

TRAINING AREA

9-14. Any level area of adequate size is satisfactory for conduct of CDs.

UNIFORM

9-15. Soldiers will wear IPFU or ACUs and boots.

EQUIPMENT

9-16. N/A.

FORMATION

9-17. For the most efficient instruction, the ideal unit size is one platoon. Larger units up to a battalion can successfully perform these drills if properly taught and mastered at the small unit level. The extended rectangular formation is prescribed.

LEADERSHIP

9-18. A PRT leader and an AI are required to instruct and lead CD 2. The instructor must be familiar with the method of teaching the exercises; the commands and counting cadence; cumulative count; formations; starting positions; and the use of AIs as described in Chapter 7. Soldiers should memorize the exercises by name and movement. The exercises are always given in cadence. Soldiers begin and terminate each exercise at the starting position and return to the position of attention before beginning the next exercise. The goal is to complete the entire drill with only enough pauses between exercises for the instructor to indicate the next one by name. This continuous method of conducting CD 2 intensifies the workload and conserves time. Considerable time and effort must be expended during the early stages to teach exercises properly to all Soldiers. Teach and practice exercises using a slow cadence (50 counts per minute) until correct form in executing each exercise is achieved.

PRECISION

9-19. Conditioning drill exercises lose much of their value unless performed exactly as prescribed. Precision should never be compromised for quantity of repetitions or speed of movement. A cadence that is too fast will not allow Soldiers to achieve a full range of movement.

PROGRESSION

9-20. Soldiers perform no more than five repetitions of each exercise while learning and practicing CDs. In the toughening phase, CD 2 is performed for five repetitions of each exercise. In the sustaining phase, CD 2 is performed for five to ten repetitions of each exercise. Do not exceed ten repetitions of each exercise. Instead, perform additional sets of the entire drill if more repetitions are desired.

INTEGRATION

9-21. Conditioning drill 2 integrates the components of strength, endurance, and mobility. This drill builds strength by challenging control of body weight and promotes endurance without the repetitive motions that often lead to overuse injuries. It also improves mobility by progressively moving the major joints through a full, controlled range of motion.

COMMANDS

9-22. Conditioning drill 2 consists of four 4-count exercises and one 8-count exercise that train the body segments listed in Table 9-4. Chapter 7 provides instructions for giving commands.

Table 9-4. Body segments trained in the conduct of CD 2

CONDITIONING DRILL 2 (CD 2) MUSCLES
HIPS THIGHS LOWER LEGS CHEST BACK TRUNK SHOULDERS ARMS
1. TURN AND LUNGE X X X X X X X X
2. SUPINE BICYCLE X X X X X X X X
3. HALF JACKS X X X X X X
4. SWIMMER X X X X X x x
5. 8-COUNT PUSH-UP X X X X X X X X

CONDITIONING DRILL 2

EXERCISE 1: TURN AND LUNGE

Purpose: This exercise develops the agility needed to rotate, lower, and raise the body for effective changes of direction during military movement drill exercises, the 300-yd SR, and individual movement techniques (Figure 9-7).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with hands on hips.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Turn 90-degrees to the left, stepping with the left foot, and pivoting on the ball of the right foot. Perform a forward lunge (facing the left) while reaching toward the ground with the right hand. The left arm swings rearward while the left hand reaches rearward at the left side of the body.
  2. Stand up, rotate to the right, and return to the starting position, stepping with the right foot and pivoting on the ball of the left foot.
  3. Turn 90-degrees to the right, stepping with the right foot and pivoting on the ball of the left foot. Perform a forward lunge (facing the right) while reaching toward the ground with the left hand. The right arm swings rearward while the right arm reaches rearward at the right side of the body.
  4. Stand up, rotate to the left, and return to the starting position, stepping with the left foot and pivoting on the ball of the right foot.

Check Points:

  • When changing directions on all counts, the lead footsteps and the rear foot pivots.
  • Keep the head in line with the spine throughout the exercise.

• Down positions on counts 1 and 3 are similar to the forward lunge, but with the hand down. Precaution: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 2

EXERCISE 2: SUPINE BICYCLE

Purpose: This exercise strengthens the muscles of the abdomen and controls the rotation of the trunk (Figure 9-8).

Starting Position: Supine position with the fingers interlaced, hands on top of the head. Hips, knees, and ankles are flexed at 90 degrees and lower legs are parallel to the ground. The head is off the ground.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Bring the left knee toward the chest while flexing and rotating the trunk to the left, attempting to touch the right elbow with the left thigh. As the left knee rises, the right leg extends.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Bring the right knee toward the chest while flexing and rotating the trunk to the right, attempting to touch the left elbow with the right thigh. As the right knee rises, the left leg extends.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

• At the starting position ensure that the hands are on top of the head, not behind the neck.

• Maintain tightness of the abdominals throughout the exercise. Precaution: On counts 1 and 3, do not jerk the neck or arch the back to assume the up position.

CONDITIONING DRILL 2

EXERCISE 3: HALF JACKS

Purpose: The purpose of this exercise is to jump and land with the legs apart, controlling the landing by laterally braking with the feet, ankles, and legs (Figure 9-9).

Starting Position: Position of attention.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Jump and land with the feet shoulder-width apart and pointed straight ahead. The arms are sideward with palms facing down, thumbs and fingers extended and joined.
  2. Jump and return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Repeat count 2, returning to the starting position.

Check Points:

• On each landing, the balls of the feet should touch first.

• On counts 1 and 3, do not raise the arms above parallel to the ground. Precaution: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 2

EXERCISE 4: SWIMMER

Purpose: This exercise strengthens the muscles of the low back and the shoulders while promoting quadrilateral coordination of the arms and legs (Figure 9-10).

Starting Position: The prone position with the arms extended, palms facing down, and toes pointed to the rear.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Raise the left arm and right leg 4 to 6 inches off the ground while arching the back slightly and looking upward.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Raise the right arm and left leg 4 to 6 inches off the ground, while arching the back slightly and looking upward.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position and throughout the exercise, maintain tightness in the abdominal and hip muscles.
  • On counts 1 and 3, raise the head slightly and look upward.
  • Keep the toes pointed throughout the exercise.

Precaution: Do not move into counts 1 and 3 with a jerking motion.

CONDITIONING DRILL 2

EXERCISE 5: 8-COUNT PUSH-UP

Purpose: This exercise combines the functional movements of the squat thrust and push-up to develop total body strength, endurance, and mobility (Figure 9-11).

Starting Position: Position of attention.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Assume the squat position.
  2. Thrust the legs backward to the front leaning rest position.
  3. Bend the elbows, lowering the body until the upper arms are parallel with the ground. Elbows should point to the rear.
  4. Return to the front leaning rest position.
  5. Repeat count 3.
  6. Repeat count 4.
  7. Return to the squat position as in count 1.
  8. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • To keep the trunk from sagging, tighten the abdominal muscles while in the starting position and maintain this contraction throughout the exercise.
  • On counts 1 through 7, the hands are directly below the shoulders with fingers spread and the middle fingers directed straight forward.
  • On counts 1 and 7, keep the heels together and raised.
  • On counts 4 and 6, straighten but do not lock the elbows.

Precautions: Allowing the trunk to sag, especially on count 2, strains the back. Avoid this by maintaining a strong abdominal contraction throughout the exercise. If the pushup cannot be performed on counts 2-6 correctly to cadence, quickly assume the 6-point stance before count 3 and return to the front leaning rest position just before performing count 7.

CONDITIONING DRILL 3

9-23. Conditioning drill 3 is conducted in a similar manner to CD 1 and 2; however, the exercises in CD 3 are more difficult and complex. Repeated jumping, landing, and changing of body positions make this a more advanced drill with greater demands placed on the lower extremities. In the toughening phase, Soldiers should not perform CD 3. In the sustaining phase, Soldiers progress from 5 to 10 repetitions. If more repetitions are desired, then perform an additional set of the entire drill. (See Table 9-5.)

Table 9-5. Body segments trained in the conduct of CD 3

CONDITIONING DRILL 3 (CD 3) MUSCLES
HIPS THIGHS LOWER LEGS CHEST BACK TRUNK SHOULDERS ARMS
1. “Y” SQUAT X X X X X X X
2. SINGLE-LEG DEAD LIFT X X X X X
3. SIDE-TO-SIDE KNEE LIFTS X X X X X X X
4. FRONT KICK ALTERNATE TOE TOUCH X X X X X X X X
5. TUCK JUMP X X X X X X X X
6. STRADDLE-RUN FORWARD AND BACKWARD X X X X
7. HALF-SQUAT LATERALS X X X X X X X X
8. FROG JUMPS FORWARD AND BACKWARD X X X X X X X X
9. ALTERNATE ¼-TURN JUMP X X X X X X X X
10. ALTERNATESTAGGERED SQUAT JUMP X X X X X X

CONDITIONING DRILL 3

EXERCISE 1: “Y” SQUAT

Purpose: This exercise develops strength, endurance, and mobility of the lower back and lower extremities (Figure 9-12).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with shoulder blades pulled rearward with arms overhead and palms inward.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Squat with arms overhead (forming a ―Y‖) without allowing the back to round.
  2. Return to the starting position by tightening the buttocks and driving upward.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

• During count 1, lower the body as far as possible without rounding the back, keeping the shoulders

drawn rearward, arms forming a ―Y‖ overhead.

  • Tighten the buttocks and drive the trunk upward to return to the starting position.
  • Heels remain on the ground throughout the exercise.

Precaution: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 3

EXERCISE 2: SINGLE-LEG DEAD LIFT

Purpose: This exercise develops strength, endurance, and flexibility of the lower back and lower extremities (Figure 9-13).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with hands on hips.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Stand maintaining balance on the left foot and bend forward at the waist. Reach straight down toward the ground in front of the body while raising the right leg to the rear.
  2. Return to the starting position by tightening the buttocks and driving upward.
  3. Stand maintaining balance on the right foot and bend forward at the waist. Reach straight down toward the ground in front of the body while raising the left leg to the rear.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • On counts 1 and 3, the hands are slightly in front of and below the shoulders with fingers spread (middle fingers point straight ahead) with the elbows straight, not locked.
  • Maintain a natural arch in the back and move the legs straight forward and backward, not at angles.
  • To prevent the trunk from sagging, tighten the abdominal muscles and maintain this contraction throughout the exercise.
  • The head is aligned with the spine and the eyes are directed to a point about two feet in front of the body.

Precaution: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 3

EXERCISE 3: SIDE-TO-SIDE KNEE LIFTS

Purpose: This exercise develops coordination, balance, and explosive strength in the legs (Figure 9-14).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with hands on hips.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Hop to the left, landing on the left foot, while simultaneously drawing the right knee toward the chest. The right hand moves comfortably down to the side toward the right ankle and the left hand touches the right knee.
  2. Hop to the right, landing on the right foot, while simultaneously drawing the left knee toward the chest, the left hand moves comfortably down to the side toward the left ankle and the right hand touches the left knee.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Repeat count 2 and return to the starting position on the final repetition.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk.
  • On all counts, do not allow the back to round; keep the head up and the eyes forward.
  • On each landing, the feet should be directed forward and maintained at shoulder distance apart. The landing should be ―soft‖ and proceed from the balls of the feet to the heels. The vertical line from the shoulders through the knees to the balls of the feet should be demonstrated on each landing.

Precaution: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 3

EXERCISE 4: FRONT KICK ALTERNATE TOE TOUCH

Purpose: This exercise develops balance, coordination, and flexibility of the legs and trunk (Figure 9-15).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with hands on hips.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Raise the left leg to the front of the body until it is parallel to the ground while simultaneously bending forward at the waist, extending the right arm forward, and reaching with the right hand toward the left foot, while the left arm reaches rearward.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Raise the right leg to the front of the body until it is parallel to the ground while simultaneously bending forward at the waist, extending the left arm forward, and reaching with the left hand toward the right foot, while the right arm reaches rearward.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk.
  • On counts 1 and 3, rotate the trunk to reach for the toes keeping the back generally straight.
  • Keep the head and the eyes forward throughout the exercise.

• Maintain a slight bend in the knee as it moves parallel to the ground. Precaution: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 3

EXERCISE 5: TUCK JUMP

Purpose: This exercise develops coordination, balance, and explosive strength in the legs (Figure 9-16).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with arms at the sides.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Perform a half squat, while driving both arms rearward. Jump upward, driving both arms forward, wrapping the hands around the knees, as the knees are drawn toward the chest. Then land in the half-squat position.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • On counts 1 and 3, do not allow the back to round; keep the head up and the eyes forward.
  • Cadence is slow to allow for precision and adequate time to properly jump and land; however, each jump on counts 1 and 3 should be performed quickly and explosively.
  • On each landing, the feet should be directed forward and maintained at shoulder distance apart. The landing should be ―soft‖ and proceed from the balls of the feet to the heels. The vertical line from the shoulders through the knees to the balls of the feet should be demonstrated on each landing.

Precaution: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 3

EXERCISE 6: STRADDLE-RUN FORWARD AND BACKWARD

Purpose: This exercise develops coordination, balance, and explosive strength in the legs (Figure 9-17).
Starting Position: Straddle stance with arms at the sides.
Cadence: MODERATE
Count:

  1. Raise the left leg 4 to 6 inches off the ground and bound forward to the left at a 45-degree angle while swinging the right arm forward and left arm rearward.
  2. Raise the right leg 4 to 6 inches off the ground and bound forward to the right at a 45-degree angle while swinging the left arm forward and right arm rearward.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Repeat count 2.
  5. Raise the left leg 4 to 6 inches off the ground and bound rearward to the left at a 45-degree angle while swinging the left arm forward and right arm rearward.
  6. Raise the right leg 4 to 6 inches off the ground and bound rearward to the right at a 45-degree angle while swinging the right arm forward and left arm rearward.
  7. Repeat count 5.
  8. Repeat count 6 and assume the starting position.

Check Points:

  • On all counts, do not allow the back to round; keep the head up and the eyes forward.
  • On each landing, the feet should be directed forward and the trail foot moves toward the lead foot, but does not make contact with the ground.

Precaution: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 3

EXERCISE 7: HALF-SQUAT LATERALS

Purpose: This exercise develops coordination, balance, and explosive strength in the legs (Figure 9-18).

Starting Position: Straddle stance, slightly crouched, assuming a half-squat, with the back straight, arms at the sides with elbows bent at 90-degrees, and palms facing forward.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Maintaining a half-squat step/hop to the left.
  2. Maintaining a half-squat step/hop to the right.
  3. Maintaining a half-squat step/hop to the right.
  4. Maintaining a half-squat step/hop to the left and return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk.
  • On all counts, do not allow the back to round; keep the head up and the eyes forward.
  • On each landing, the feet should be directed forward and maintained at shoulder distance apart. The landing should be ―soft‖ and proceed from the balls of the feet to the heels.

Precaution: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 3

EXERCISE 8: FROG JUMPS FORWARD AND BACKWARD

Purpose: This exercise develops coordination, balance, and explosive strength in the legs (Figure 9-19).

Starting Position: Straddle stance, slightly crouched, assuming a half-squat, with the back straight, arms at the sides with elbows bent at 90-degrees, and palms facing forward.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Maintain a half-squat and hop forward.
  2. Maintain a half-squat and hop backward.
  3. Repeat count 2.
  4. Maintain a half-squat and hop forward, returning to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk.
  • On all counts, do not allow the back to round; keep the head up and the eyes forward.
  • On each landing, the feet should be directed forward and maintained at shoulder distance apart. The landing should be ―soft‖ and proceed from the balls of the feet to the heels.

Precaution: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 3

EXERCISE 9: ALTERNATE ¼-TURN JUMP

Purpose: This exercise develops balance, explosive strength in the legs, and control of trunk rotation (Figure 9-20).

Starting Position: Straddle stance, slightly crouched, assuming a half-squat, with the back straight, arms at the sides with elbows bent at 90-degrees, and palms facing forward.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Jump upward and twist the hips, turning the legs 90-degrees to the left.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Jump upward and twist the hips, turning the legs 90-degrees to the right.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk.
  • On counts 1 and 3, do not allow the back to round; keep the head up and the eyes forward.
  • The upper body does not turn; the movement involves only the hips and legs.
  • On each landing, the feet should be directed forward and maintained at shoulder distance apart. The landing should be ―soft‖ and proceed from the balls of the feet to the heels. The vertical line from the shoulders through the knees to the balls of the feet should be demonstrated on each landing.

Precaution: N/A

CONDITIONING DRILL 3

EXERCISE 10: ALTERNATE-STAGGERED SQUAT JUMP

Purpose: This exercise develops balance and explosive strength of the legs (Figure 9-21).

Starting Position: Staggered stance with the left leg back and arms at sides; the trunk is generally straight, but tilted slightly forward.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Squat and touch the ground, between the legs, with the fingertips of the left hand. Jump forcefully into the air, switching legs in mid-air to land with the right leg back and arms at the sides.
  2. Squat and touch the ground between the legs with the fingertips of the right hand. Jump forcefully into the air, switching legs in mid-air to land with the left leg back and arms at the sides.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Repeat count 2 and return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, tighten the abdominals to stabilize the trunk.
  • On counts 1 and 3, do not allow the back to round; keep the head up and the eyes forward.
  • Cadence is slow to allow for precision and adequate time to properly jump and land; however, each jump should be performed quickly and explosively.
  • On each landing, the feet should be oriented to the front. The landing should be ―soft‖ and proceed from the balls of the feet to the heels.

Precaution: N/A

PUSH-UP AND SIT-UP DRILL

9-24. Push-ups and sit-ups develop upper body strength, endurance, and mobility, and specifically prepare Soldiers for APFT performance. Push-ups and sit-ups build upper body and trunk muscular strength and endurance by challenging control of body weight. The PSD promotes muscular endurance without the repetitive motions that often lead to overuse injuries. They improve mobility by progressively moving the major joints through a full, controlled range of motion.

TRAINING AREA

9-25. Any level area of adequate size is satisfactory for conduct of the PSD.

UNIFORM

9-26. Soldiers will wear IPFU or ACUs and boots.

EQUIPMENT

9-27. Stop watch.

FORMATION

9-28. For the most efficient instruction, the ideal unit size is one platoon. Larger units up to a battalion can successfully perform these drills if properly taught and mastered at the small unit level. The extended rectangular formation is prescribed.

LEADERSHIP

9-29. A PRT leader and AI are required to instruct and lead timed sets of push-ups and sit-ups. The leader must know how to teach these exercises. He must know the commands, cadence counts, cumulative count, formations, starting positions, and how to effectively use AIs (Chapter 7).

METHODOLOGY

9-30. The PSD enhances APFT performance in the push-up and sit-up events. The PSD is conducted as follows:

  • The first and third ranks conduct the push-up first. The second and fourth ranks count repetitions out loud and monitor technique to ensure the Soldiers perform the push-ups to Army standard (hand placement is determined by the Soldier IAW Appendix A) for 30 to 60 seconds. After the first and third ranks complete the push-ups, the ranks swap places: the second and fourth ranks do push-ups and the first and third ranks count and monitor proper technique. After all four ranks complete the first timed set of push-ups; the same process is repeated for sit-ups.
  • The sit-up is conducted the same as the push-up: first and third perform, second and fourth count and monitor technique, but also hold the feet of the first and third ranks. Again, when the first and third ranks finish, the ranks swap out again, and the second and fourth ranks perform while the first and third ranks count, monitor technique, and hold the feet.
  • Timed sets continue like this, alternating between push-ups and sit-ups and between paired ranks, until all the desired number of timed sets have been completed. The Soldiers should not perform all of their sets of timed push-ups and then perform all of their sets of timed sit-ups. Alternating allows proper work to rest ratio to provide the required recovery. Avoid performing all of one exercise or the other.
  • As with any activity, PRT leaders should perform the exercises with the Soldiers in order to determine the appropriate intensity of the PRT session.

PRECISION

9-31. Push-ups and sit-ups lose much of their value unless performed exactly as prescribed. Precision should never be compromised for quantity of repetitions or speed of movement.

PROGRESSION

9-32. Soldiers perform no more than five repetitions of each exercise while learning and practicing the PSD. They perform timed sets of push-ups and sit-ups during the activity part of the PRT session. They perform as many correct repetitions of push-ups and sit-ups during the 30-second timed sets as they can, progressing to 60-second timed sets. Soldiers that fail with time remaining in the timed set of push-ups will go to their knees and continue to perform the push-up in the six-point stance until time has expired within the timed set.

INTEGRATION

9-33. Performing timed sets of push-ups and sit-ups integrates the components of strength, endurance, and mobility.

COMMANDS

9-34. Follow the procedures in paragraph 9-30.

BODY SEGMENTS TRAINED

9-35. The PSD consists of two exercises that train the body segments listed in Table 9-6. Refer to Appendix A for illustrations and descriptions of the push-up and sit-up IAW the APFT.

CLIMBING DRILLS

9-36. The purpose of the CL is to improve upper body and trunk strength, and the ability to climb and negotiate obstacles. Success in climbing and surmounting obstacles depends on both conditioning and technique. These drills include exercises that condition the muscles of the body that are predominant in climbing. The entire body is involved during climbing by helping to change or stabilize position.

The hands and feet act as anchor points and initiate movement to the next position.

The abdominal and back muscles stabilize the body’s position.

The arms push and pull upward with assistance from the much stronger legs.

9-37. Climbing drills, when combined with CDs, the push-up sit-up drill, the GD, and the strength training circuit comprise a well-balanced program of functional strength development. Climbing drills are performed during the activity part of a PRT session.

TRAINING AREA

9-38. The CLs are best performed on climbing bars (Appendix B). To conduct the CLs with multiple Soldiers at one time, allow at least one bar for every three Soldiers. At least one bar is required for every six Soldiers when the CLs are coupled with other strength and mobility drills.

UNIFORM

9-39. Soldiers will wear ACUs and boots or IPFU. Boots and ACUs will be worn when performing the CD in combination with the GD. Additional equipment such as body armor (IOTV), ACH, and weapon will be used when performing CD 2 in the sustaining phase.

EQUIPMENT

9-40. The CDs are best conducted on climbing bars. The thickness of the bars is no more than 1 ½-inch outside diameter. The bars are supported by 6-by-6 inch pressure-treated posts sunk at least 3 feet into the ground and secured with cement. The bar distance from inside post to inside post must be at least 5 feet. The bars should be no more than 8 feet off the ground. A variety of heights or steps should be available to accommodate all Soldiers. Figure 9-22 shows the recommended climbing bar apparatus and Soldier use. (Appendix B provides detailed specifications for constructing climbing bars.)

SPOTTING

9-41. Two spotters are used during CL 1 and 2 to ensure precision, adherence to proper cadence, and safety by assisting Soldiers who are unable to properly perform the desired number of repetitions. All Soldiers performing CL 1 and 2 are required to use spotters, unless they demonstrate the ability to perform 5 repetitions of an exercise unassisted. The Soldier then gives a verbal cue ―no spot needed.‖ As Soldiers develop more strength, they will require less assistance from the spotters.

Spotting the Straight-Arm Pull, Pull-Up, and Alternating Grip Pull-Up

9-42. The front spotter assumes a staggered stance with the palms toward the exerciser at approximately chest

level. The front spotter’s primary role is to support the exerciser if their grip fails. The rear spotter assumes a

staggered stance and holds the Soldiers feet on their thighs or abdomen. The hands are placed above the ankles to hold them securely. The role of the rear spotter is to provide a stable base for the exerciser to push against with his legs. When spotting is performed correctly, the rear spotter will neither have to lift nor go up and down

with the exerciser. The rear spotter must anticipate the last repletion and release the Soldier when the ―down‖ command is given before the ―dismount‖ command. Soldiers are required to use the foot pegs when mounting and dismounting the bar. This is done to ensure safety and to reduce injuries. Jumping from the mounted position causes compression to the spine and other joints of the body, possibly resulting in injury.

Spotting Heel Hook and Leg Tuck

9-43. One spotter stands on each side of the exerciser in the straddle stance. The rear hand of each spotter is placed in the small of the back and the forward hand is placed beneath the thigh above the back of the knee. Both hands remain in contact with the exerciser throughout the exercise. The rear hand is used primarily to prevent the exerciser from swaying, while the forward hand helps lift the legs into the ‗up’ position. Soldiers are required to use the foot pegs when mounting and dismounting the bar. This is done to ensure safety and to reduce injuries. Jumping from the mounted position causes compression to the spine and other joints of the body, possibly resulting in injury.

FORMATION

9-44. Three Soldiers are assigned to each bar. One Soldier exercises and two Soldiers perform as spotters.

LEADERSHIP

9-45. Both a PRT leader and an AI are required in order to instruct and lead CLs. The PRT leader must be familiar with the method of teaching the exercises; the commands and counting cadence; cumulative count; formations; and the use of AIs as described in Chapter 7. The PRT leader must ensure that spotters are properly trained and maintain positive control of the Soldier performing the CL at all times.

9-46. Soldiers should memorize the exercises by name and movement. The exercises are always given in cadence. Soldiers rotate during each exercise until all three have completed the exercise. Only then may the PRT leader move them to the next exercise. Considerable time and effort must be expended during the early stages to teach precise performance of each exercise.

PRECISION

9-47. Climbing drills lose much of their value unless performed exactly as prescribed. Spotters ensure safety and precise execution by helping Soldiers who are tired or unable to properly execute five repetitions on their own. Two spotters help Soldiers though each exercise. As Soldiers become more proficient in each exercise, they will need less assistance and should eventually be able to perform the drill unaided; however, spotters are always present. Spotters help reduce swinging and stabilize body position. Precision should never be compromised for quantity of repetitions or speed of movement. Soldiers should, therefore, perform all movements in a controlled manner without jerking into or out of positions. They should avoid relaxing in the extended hang position, as this can place excessive stress on the shoulder and elbow joints. Soldiers should maintain a contraction in the muscles of the shoulders and upper back to avoid a relaxed, extended hang.

PROGRESSION

9-48. In the sustaining phase, Soldiers progress from 5 to 10 repetitions of each exercise in CL 1 with or without assistance, using only their body weight as resistance. The goal is to perform all five exercises unassisted.

9-49. In the sustaining phase, Soldiers perform CL 2 while under load. Soldiers increase resistance by wearing LBE/LBV, ACH, body armor (IOTV), and individual weapons. Spotters provide assistance until Soldiers can complete all five exercises without help.

INTEGRATION

9-50. The primary emphasis of the CLs is functional strength development. The use of equipment in CL 2

develops the Soldiers’ ability to manipulate their body weights under load. The various exercises also involve

movements that require mobility. Climbing drills, when combined with CDs, the push-up sit-up drill, the GD, and the strength training circuit comprise a well-balanced program of total body functional strength development.

COMMANDS

9-51. Climbing drills 1 and 2 each consist of five 2-count exercises.

HAND POSITIONS

9-52. Throughout the drills, a variety of hand positions are used to thoroughly train the musculature of the arms, forearms, and hands. Hands are placed shoulder-width apart with thumbs around the bar for the overhand grip. Hands are placed next to each other with thumbs around the bar for the alternating grips (Figure 9-23).

CLIMBING DRILL 1

9-53. Climbing drill 1 (CL 1) improves upper body and core strength and the ability to climb and negotiate obstacles. Climbing drill 1 is always performed in its entirety in the order listed. Soldiers perform 5 to 10 repetitions of each exercise in CL 1 with or without assistance, using only their body weight as resistance. The goal is to perform 5 to 10 repetitions of all five exercises unassisted. If a second set is performed, the entire drill is repeated in the order listed. Table 9-7 lists the body segments trained in CL1.

CLIMBING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 1: STRAIGHT-ARM PULL

Purpose: This exercise develops the ability to initiate the pull-up motion and maintain a contraction in the extended hang position (Figure 9-24).

Starting Position: Extended hang using the overhand grip.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Keeping the arms straight, pull the body upward using the shoulders and upper back muscles only.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Throughout the exercise, keep the arms shoulder width, palms facing away from the body, with the thumbs around the bar.
  • Throughout the exercise, keep the elbows straight, but not locked.
  • On count 1, pull the body up by engaging the shoulder muscles (squeeze the shoulder blades together).

Precaution: Refer to paragraph 9-42 for spotting.

CLIMBING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 2: HEEL HOOK

Purpose: This exercise develops the ability to raise the legs from a hanging position and hook the feet securely on the bar (Figure 9-25).

Starting Position: Extended hang using the alternating grip, left or right.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Pull with the arms and curl the lower body toward the bar. Raise the feet above the bar and interlock them securely around the bar.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • On count 1, initiate movement by first pulling with the arms.
  • Secure the feet over the bar by crossing one foot over the other at the ankles.

• On count 2, fully extend the arms to return to the starting position. Precaution: Refer to paragraph 9-43 for spotting.

CLIMBING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 3: PULL-UP

Purpose: This exercise develops the ability to pull the body upward while hanging (Figure 9-26).
Starting Position: Extended hang using the overhand grip.
Cadence: MODERATE
Count:

  1. Keeping the body straight and pull upward with the arms until the chin is above the bar.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Throughout the exercise, keep the feet together.
  • Throughout the exercise, the arms shoulder-width, palms facing away from the body, with the thumbs around the bar.

Precaution: Refer to paragraph 9-42 for spotting.

CLIMBING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 4: LEG TUCK

Purpose: This exercise develops the abdominal, hip flexor, and grip strength essential to climbing a rope (Figure 9-27).

Starting Position: Extended hang using the alternating grip, left or right.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Pull up with the arms and raise the knees toward the chest until the elbows touch the thighs just above the knees.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

• Throughout the exercise, keep the feet together.

• On count 1, the thighs and elbows touch just above the knees. Precaution: Refer to paragraph 9-43 for spotting.

CLIMBING DRILL 1

EXERCISE 5: ALTERNATING GRIP PULL-UP

Purpose: This exercise develops the muscles used to pull the body upward while using an alternating grip (Figure 9-28).

Starting Position: Extended hang using the alternating grip, left or right.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Keep the body straight, pull upward, allowing the head to move to the left or right side of the bar, and touch the left or right shoulder to the bar.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • When using the left alternating grip, Soldiers touch the left shoulder to the bar on count 1. If the right alternating grip is used, Soldiers touch the right shoulder to the bar on count 1.
  • On count 2, the arms are fully extended to return to the starting position.
  • Keep the feet together, throughout the exercise.

Precaution: Refer to paragraph 9-42 for spotting.

CLIMBING DRILL 2

9-54. Climbing drill 2 (CL 2) is a performance-oriented drill conducted in the sustaining phase that prepares Soldiers for critical tasks under fighting load such as climbing, traversing a rope, and pulling the body up on to a ledge or through a window. Soldiers increase the resistance by performing CL 2 with their LBE/LBV, body armor (IOTV), ACH, and individual weapon. They will hold the UP position of exercise 1, the flexed-arm hang, for five seconds (one repetition, only) and perform five repetitions of each of the remaining four exercises: the heel hook, the pull-up, the leg tuck, and the alternating grip pull-up. Spotters provide assistance until Soldiers can complete all repetitions without assistance. Soldiers may progress from five to ten repetitions and one to two sets of CL 2 once they are able to perform most of the drill unassisted. The goal is to perform 5 to 10 repetitions of all five exercises unassisted. If a second set is performed, the entire drill is repeated in the order listed. Table 9-8 lists the body segments trained in CL 2.

CLIMBING DRILL 2

EXERCISE 1: FLEXED-ARM HANG

Purpose: This exercise develops the ability to hold the body in the flexed-arm hang position (Figure 9-29).
Starting Position: Extended hang using the overhand grip.
Cadence: N/A
Count: This exercise is performed for one repetition of five seconds.

  1. On the command UP, keeping the body straight, pull upward with the arms until the chin is above the bar and hold for five seconds.
  2. On the command DOWN, return to the starting position.

Check Points:

• Throughout the exercise, the palms are facing away from the body, with the thumbs around the bar.

• Throughout the exercise, keep the feet close together. Precaution: Refer to paragraph 9-42 for spotting.

CLIMBING DRILL 2

EXERCISE 2: HEEL HOOK

Purpose: This exercise develops the ability to raise the legs from a hanging position and hook the feet securely on the bar (Figure 9-30).

Starting Position: Extended hang using the alternating grip, left or right.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Pull with the arms and the body toward the bar. Raise the feet above the bar and interlock them securely around the bar.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • On count 1, initiate movement by first pulling with the arms.
  • Secure the feet over the bar by crossing one foot over the other at the ankles.

• On count 2, fully extended the arms to return to the starting position. Precaution: Refer to paragraph 9-43 for spotting.

CLIMBING DRILL 2

EXERCISE 3: PULL-UP

Purpose: This exercise develops the ability to pull the body upward while hanging (Figure 9-31).
Starting Position: Extended hang using the overhand grip.
Cadence: MODERATE
Count:

  1. Keeping the body straight, pull upward with the arms until the chin is above the bar.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Throughout the exercise, keep the feet together.
  • Throughout the exercise, arms are shoulder-width, palms facing away from the body, with thumbs around the bar.

Precaution: Refer to paragraph 9-42 for spotting.

CLIMBING DRILL 2

EXERCISE 4: LEG TUCK

Purpose: This exercise develops the abdominal, hip flexor, and grip strength essential to climbing a rope (Figure 9-32).

Starting Position: Extended hang using the alternating grip, left or right.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Pull up with the arms and raise the knees toward the chest until the elbows touch the thighs just above the knees.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

• Throughout the exercise, keep the feet together.

• On count 1, the thighs and elbows touch just above knees. Precaution: Refer to paragraph 9-43 for spotting.

CLIMBING DRILL 2

EXERCISE 5: ALTERNATING GRIP PULL-UP

Purpose: This exercise develops the ability to pull the body upward while hanging with an alternating grip (Figure 9-33).

Starting Position: Extended hang using the alternating grip, left or right.

Cadence: MODERATE

Count:

  1. Keeping the body straight, pull upward, allowing the head to move to the left or right side of the bar and touch the left or right shoulder to the bar.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • If the alternating grip left is used, Soldiers should touch the left shoulder to the bar on count 1.
  • If the alternating grip right is used, Soldiers should touch the right shoulder to the bar on count 1.
  • On count 2, the arms are fully extended to return to the starting position.

• Throughout the exercise, keep the feet together. Precaution: Refer to paragraph 9-42 for spotting.

STRENGTH TRAINING CIRCUIT

9-55. The strength training circuit (STC) produces a total-body training effect for the development of strength and mobility. (See Table 9-9.) A sequence combining a CL, a military movement drill, and kettlebell exercises works every muscle group with active recovery between stations of exercise. The STC is best conducted at platoon level. The STC may be laid out around a running track, field, or any area of adequate size, and with access to climbing bars and kettlebells. This paragraph provides a diagram of the STC, using a running track, climbing bars, and kettlebells. (See Figure 9-34.) Conduct preparation IAW Chapter 7 after a walk-through and brief explanation of the STC exercise stations. (See Table 9-10.) The circuit may be completed in three rotations. Soldiers spend 60 seconds at each station. The instructor controls exercise time using a stopwatch and uses a whistle or horn to signal a change of station. At the end of all circuit rotations, recovery is conducted IAW instructions in Chapter 7.

Table 9-9. Body segments trained in the conduct of the STC

STRENGTH TRAINING CIRCUIT (STC) MUSCLES
HIPS THIGHS LOWER LEGS CHEST BACK TRUNK SHOULDERS ARMS
1. SUMO SQUAT X X X X X X X X
2. STRAIGHT-LEG DEAD LIFT X X X X X X X
3. FORWARD LUNGE X X X X X X X X
4. 8-COUNT STEP-UP X X X X X X X
5. PULL-UP OR STRAIGHTARM PULL X X X X
6. SUPINE CHEST PRESS X X X X X
7. BENT-OVER ROW X X X X
8. OVER-HEAD PUSH-PRESS X X X X X X X X
9. SUPINE BODY TWIST X X X X X X X X
10. LEG TUCK X X X X X X X X

Table 9-10. Equipment required to conduct platoon-size STC

Exercise Station Kettlebells/Weights Climbing Bars
1. Sumo Squat 6 X 50 lbs 6 X 25 lbs N/A
2. Straight-leg Deadlift 12 X 40 lbs 12 X 25 lbs N/A
3. Forward Lunge 12 X 20 lbs 12 X 10 lbs N/A
4. 8-Count Step-up 12 X 30 lbs 12 X 15 lbs N/A
5. Pull-up or Straight-arm Pull N/A 6
6. Supine Chest Press 12 X 40 lbs 12 X 15 lbs N/A
7. Bent-over Row 12 X 20 lbs 12 X 10 lbs N/A
8. Overhead Push Press 12 X 30 lbs 12 X 15 lbs N/A
9. Supine Body Twist 6 X 25 lbs 6 X 10 lbs N/A
10. Leg Tuck N/A 6
To conduct the STC at platoon level, 12 climbing bars and 168 kettlebells are required. The following is a list of the number of kettlebells required by weight: 6 @ 50 lbs, 24 @ 40 lbs, 24 @ 30 lbs, 24 @ 25 lbs, 24 @ 20 lbs, 36 @15 lbs and 30 @ 10 lbs.

STRENGTH TRAINING CIRCUIT

STATION 1: SUMO SQUAT

Purpose: This exercise develops strength and mobility of the hips, legs, and lower back muscles (Figure 9-35).

Starting Position: Straddle stance with the feet slightly wider than the shoulders and the toes pointing outward. Hold a single kettlebell with both hands, in front of the body, using a pronated grip (palms facing the body).

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Squat while leaning slightly forward from the waist with the head up. Move downward until the upper legs parallel the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Point:

• At the end of count 1, the shoulders, knees, and balls of the feet should be aligned.

• Keep heels on the ground and back straight throughout the exercise. Precautions: Always perform this exercise at a slow cadence. Do not allow the legs to lower beyond parallel to

the ground on count 1. Doing so would increase the stress on the knees. Movement to Station 2: Verticals (refer to Chapter 10, Endurance and Mobility Activities, Figure 10-4).

STRENGTH TRAINING CIRCUIT

STATION 2: STRAIGHT-LEG DEAD LIFT

Purpose: This exercise develops strength, endurance, and mobility of the lower back and lower extremities (Figure 9-36).

Starting Position: Straddle stance holding the kettlebells in the front of the legs using a pronated grip (hands facing the thighs). Keep the legs straight, with the knees slightly bent throughout the exercise.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Lean forward from the waist with the head up. Move downward until the back is flat and parallel to the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Point:

  • At the end of count 1, the hips, knees, and the balls of the feet should be aligned.
  • Keep heels on the ground and back straight and parallel to the ground.

Precaution: Always perform this exercise at a slow cadence. Movement to Station 3: Laterals (left). Refer to Chapter 10, Endurance and Mobility Activities, Figure 10-5.

STRENGTH TRAINING CIRCUIT

STATION 3: FORWARD LUNGE

Purpose: This exercise develops functional leg strength, promotes trunk stability and safely trains Soldiers to lift objects off the ground in front of them (Figure 9-37).

Starting Position: Straddle stance holding the kettlebells at the sides using a neutral grip.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Step forward with the left leg as in the forward lunge as in the PD, allowing the left knee to bend until the left thigh is parallel to the ground. Lean slightly forward from the waist and bring the kettlebells to the left and right sides of the forward leg.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1 with the right leg.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • At the starting position, set the hips and keep the abdominals tight.
  • On counts 1 and 3, keep the forward heel flat on the ground and the rear heel up.
  • On counts 1 and 3, keep the forward knee directly over the ball of the foot.
  • On counts 1 and 3, lean the trunk slightly forward.
  • On counts 2 and 4, push off vigorously with the forward leg without jerking the trunk backward.

Precautions: Do not allow the forward knee to go beyond the forward toes or waiver from side to side. Do not jerk the trunk rearward to return to the starting position.

Movement to Station 4: Laterals (right). Refer to Chapter 10, Endurance and Mobility Activities, Figure 10-5.

STRENGTH TRAINING CIRCUIT

STATION 4: 8-COUNT STEP-UP

Purpose: This exercise develops strength in the hips and legs and promotes trunk stability (Figure 9-38).

Starting Position: Straddle stance holding the kettlebells at the sides using a neutral grip.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Step up on a 12 to 18 inch step with the left foot, keeping the kettlebells at the sides of the body.
  2. Step up with the right foot.
  3. Step down with the left foot.
  4. Step down with the right foot.
  5. Step up on a 12 to 18 inch step with the right foot, keeping the kettlebells at the sides of the body.
  6. Step up with the left foot.
  7. Step down with the right foot.
  8. Step down with the left foot and return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • On counts 1, 3, 5 and 7, keep the forward knee directly over the ball of the forward foot.
  • On counts 1, 3, 5 and 7, lean the trunk slightly forward.
  • On counts 1, 3, 5 and 7, push off vigorously with the forward leg without jerking the trunk backward.

Precautions: Do not allow the forward knee to go beyond the toes of the forward foot or waiver from side to side. Do not jerk the trunk rearward to return to the starting position.

Movement to Station 5: Run.

STRENGTH TRAINING CIRCUIT

STATION 5: PULL-UP OR STRAIGHT-ARM PULL

PULL-UP Purpose: This exercise develops the ability to pull the body upward while hanging (Figure 9-39). Starting Position: Extended hang using the overhand grip. Cadence: MODERATE Count:

  1. Keeping the body straight, pull upward with the arms until the chin is above the bar.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Throughout the exercise, keep the feet together.
  • Throughout the exercise, keep the arms shoulder-width apart, palms facing away from the body, with the thumbs around the bar.

Precaution: N/A
Movement to Station 6: Run.

STRAIGHT-ARM PULL Purpose: This exercise develops the ability to initiate the pull-up motion and maintain a contraction in the

extended hang position (Figure 9-40).
Starting Position: Extended hang using the overhand grip.
Cadence: MODERATE
Count:

  1. Keeping the body straight, pull the body upward using the shoulders and back muscles only.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Throughout the exercise, keep the arms shoulder width, palms facing away from the body, with the thumbs around the bar.
  • Throughout the exercise, keep the elbows straight, but not locked.
  • On count 1, pull the body up by engaging the shoulder muscles (squeeze the shoulder blades together).

Precaution: N/A

Movement to Station 6: Run.

STRENGTH TRAINING CIRCUIT

STATION 6: SUPINE CHEST PRESS

Purpose: This exercise strengthens the muscles of the chest, shoulders, and triceps muscles (Figure 9-41).

Starting Position: Supine position with the knees bent at 90 degrees and the feet 8 to 12 inches apart and flat on the ground. Hold the kettlebells in front of the shoulders using a pronated grip (palms facing up). The back of the upper arms should rest on the ground and the forearms should be perpendicular to the ground. The head is on the ground.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Extend the elbows, raising the kettlebells until the upper arms are straight (not locked) and perpendicular to the ground.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

• Keep the head on the ground throughout the exercise.

• On counts 1 and 3, straighten, but do not lock the elbows. Precaution: N/A Movement to Station 7: Laterals (left). Refer to Chapter 10, Endurance and Mobility Activities, Figure 10-5.

STRENGTH TRAINING CIRCUIT

STATION 7: BENT-OVER ROW

Purpose: This exercise strengthens the shoulders, upper back, and biceps muscles (Figure 9-42).

Starting Position: Forward leaning stance with the arms hanging straight in front of the legs and the hands holding the kettlebells using a neutral grip (palms facing inward).

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Bend the elbows, raising the kettlebells to the chest.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • On counts 2 and 4 the elbows straighten but do not lock.
  • To prevent the trunk from sagging, tighten the abdominal muscles while in the starting position and hold this contraction throughout the exercise.

Precaution: N/A
Movement to Station 8: Laterals (right). Refer to Chapter 10, Endurance and Mobility Activities, Figure 10-5.

STRENGTH TRAINING CIRCUIT

STATION 8: OVERHEAD PUSH PRESS

Purpose: This exercise strengthens the shoulders and triceps muscles (Figure 9-43).

Starting Position: Straddle stance holding the kettlebells at the collar bones using a neutral grip (palms inward).

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. From the starting position slightly flex the hips and knees (slight squat) with feet flat on the floor, keeping the upper body and upper arms parallel to the ground. Forcefully extend the hips, knees, and ankles while simultaneously extending the elbows to raise the kettlebells overhead.
  2. Return to the starting position by flexing the elbows, controlling the descent to the collar bones and shoulders while simultaneously flexing the hips and knees to reduce the impact of the kettlebells on the shoulders.
  3. Repeat count 1.
  4. Repeat count 2, returning to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • Hold the head and neck in a neutral position, looking straight ahead or slightly upward.
  • Perform counts 1 and 3 in a fast, continuous motion.
  • Always control the descent of the kettlebells during counts 2 and 4 to avoid injury to the trunk and back.
  • On counts 1 and 3, straighten the elbows but do not lock them.
  • Tighten the abdominal muscles while in the starting position and hold this contraction throughout the exercise to ensure trunk stability.

Precaution: N/A

Movement to Station 9: Verticals. Refer to Chapter 10, Endurance and Mobility Activities, Figure 10-4.

STRENGTH TRAINING CIRCUIT

STATION 9: SUPINE BODY TWIST

Purpose: This exercise strengthens the trunk muscles and promotes trunk control (Figure 9-44).

Starting Position: Supine position with hips and knees bent at 90 degrees. Hold one kettlebell over the trunk using a neutral grip with the upper arms off the ground and elbows bent 90 degrees. To assume the starting position from the position of attention with the kettlebell on the ground, (1) assume the seated position and grasp a single kettlebell at each side of the handle with palms facing inward, (2) assume the supine position,

(3) raise the kettlebell to the starting position over the trunk and raise the feet off the ground.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Rotate the kettlebell to the left and the legs to the right.
  2. Return to the starting position.
  3. Rotate the kettlebell to the right and the legs to the left.
  4. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

  • On counts 1 and 3, the back is straight and the knees are slightly bent.
  • The head is off the ground and in line with the trunk and the chin is tucked throughout the exercise.

• On counts 1 and 3, the upper arms remain off the ground. Precaution: Do not swing the arms or arch the back to raise the kettlebell on counts 1 and 3. Movement to Station 10: Backward run.

STRENGTH TRAINING CIRCUIT

STATION 10: LEG TUCK

Purpose: This exercise develops the abdominal, hip flexor, and grip strength essential to climbing a rope (Figure 9-45).

Starting Position: Extended hang using the alternating grip, left or right.

Cadence: SLOW

Count:

  1. Pull up with the arms and raise the knees toward the chest until the elbows touch the thighs just above the knees.
  2. Return to the starting position.

Check Points:

• Throughout the exercise, keep the feet together.

• On count 1, the thighs and elbows touch just above the knees. Precaution: N/A Movement to Station 1: Backward run.

GUERRILLA DRILL

9-56. The GD, performed in the sustaining phase, consists of three exercises that develop leg power, coordination, and the ability to lift and carry another Soldier. When the Soldiers can precisely execute each exercise and carry, the drill is performed continuously for 1-3 sets. All movement in the carry position is performed at quick time. Each exercise and carry must be taught and demonstrated before Soldiers try to perform the drill. When teaching and demonstrating the GD, use the extended rectangular formation (covered). In the illustrations that follow, Soldier ―A‖ refers to the Soldier performing the carry, and Soldier ―B‖ refers to the Soldier being carried. The drill is always performed in its entirety in the order listed.

TRAINING AREA

9-57. Any dry, level area of adequate size (same as MMD 1) and free from hazards (holes, debris) is satisfactory for conduct of the GD.

UNIFORM

9-58. Soldiers will wear IPFU or ACUs.

EQUIPMENT

9-59. Mark GD area with cones.

FORMATION

9-60. For the most efficient instruction, the unit size should be limited to one platoon. Larger units up to a battalion can successfully perform these drills if properly taught and mastered at the small unit level. The extended rectangular formation (covered) is prescribed.

LEADERSHIP

9-61. A PRT leader and AI are required to instruct and lead the GD. The instructor must be familiar with the method of teaching the exercises; the commands and counting cadence; formations; starting positions; and the use of AIs as described in Chapter 7, Execution of Training. Soldiers should memorize the exercises by name and movement. Considerable time and effort must be expended during the early stages to teach exercises properly to all Soldiers.

PRECISION

9-62. GD exercises lose much of their value unless performed exactly as prescribed. Precision should never be compromised for speed of movement. Moving too fast will not allow Soldiers to perform the exercises with proper technique and may lead to injury. All movement in the carry position is performed at quick time.

PROGRESSION

9-63. Soldiers perform no more than one repetition of each exercise while learning and practicing the GD. The GD is performed in the sustaining phase during the activity part of the PRT session. Soldiers will perform one set of the entire drill, progressing to three sets.

INTEGRATION

9-64. The GD exercises integrate the components of strength, endurance, and mobility through functional movements that relate directly to the performance of WTBDs.

COMMANDS

9-65. The GD consists of three exercises that are performed in the sequenced prescribed and trains the body segments listed in Table 9-11. The commands for execution of the drill and starting positions for each exercise are described in Chapter 7.

GUERRILLA DRILL

EXERCISE 1: SHOULDER ROLL

Purpose: This exercise develops the Soldier’s ability to safely fall and roll-up to a standing position (Figure 9-46).

Starting Position: Straddle stance.

Movement: Step forward with the left foot, squat down, and make a wheel with the arms by placing the left hand on the ground with the fingers facing to the rear; the right hand is also on the ground with the fingers facing forward. Tuck the chin to avoid injury to the neck. Push off with the right leg and roll over the left shoulder along the left side of the body. To roll to the opposite side, step forward and switch hand and leg positions. Progress to continuously walking and alternating rolling on opposite sides.

Check Points:

  • Lead with the left foot when rolling on the left shoulder and the right foot when rolling on the right shoulder.
  • Hands are placed on the ground, facing each other with the middle fingertips of each hand touching at the tips so the arms form a wheel.
  • Rotate the upper body so the lead elbow is pointing straight to the front while maintaining a wheel with the arms.
  • Tuck the chin so ground contact is made with the arms, shoulder blades, and back, but not with the neck.
  • The momentum of the roll brings Soldiers up to their knees. Continue to the feet by pushing off with the rear leg while standing up on the front leg.

Precautions: The PRT leader and an AI(s) must ensure that Soldiers are in the proper squatting position for the roll by ensuring that their hands are on the ground and their chins are tucked before rolling.

GUERRILLA DRILL

EXERCISE 2: LUNGE WALK

Purpose: This exercise develops the leg power needed to move both vertically and horizontally (Figure 9-47).

Starting Position: Straddle stance.

Movement: Walk forward, starting with the left foot, stepping as in the forward lunge. Lightly touch the knee of the rear leg to the ground with each step. Without returning to the starting position, continue to lunge walk to the 25-yard stop point by alternating legs.

Check Points:

  • Incorporate arm swing with the arm opposite the forward leg raised parallel to the ground.
  • Keep the back straight and the head up.

• Do not allow the knee of the lead leg to move forward of the toes of the forward foot. Precaution: Do not allow the knee of the rear leg to forcefully contact the ground.

GUERRILLA DRILL

EXERCISE 3: SOLDIER CARRY

Purpose: This exercise develops the Soldier’s ability to carry a conscious or unconscious Soldier of comparable size (Figure 9-48).

Starting Position: Soldier ―B‖ assumes the prone position, arms overhead. Soldier ―A‖ straddles Soldier ―B‖ and squats, reaching under Soldier ―B’s‖ armpits. Soldier ―A‖ stands lifting Soldier ―B‖ to his knees. Soldier ―A‖ continues to lift Soldier ―B‖ to his feet, leaning him back slightly to lock the legs. Soldier ―A‖ raises one of Soldier ―B’s‖ arms overhead and walks under the arm to the front of Soldier ―B,‖ oriented sideways to Soldier ―B.‖ Soldier ―A‖ bends his knees and leans forward, placing one arm through Soldier ―B’s‖ legs. Soldier ―A‖ leans Soldier ―B‖ forward until he lies across Soldier ―A’s‖ shoulders. Soldier ―A‖ stands up, lifting Soldier ―B‖ off the ground. Soldier ―A,‖ using the hand of his arm that is between Soldier ―B’s‖ legs, grasps the wrist of Soldier ―B’s‖ arm that is hanging over Soldier ―A’s‖ shoulder.

Movement: Soldier ―A‖ moves 25-yards at quick time; then Soldier ―B‖ dismounts; the Soldiers then change positions and return to the starting point.

Check Points:

  • Soldier ―A‖ should squat low and grasp Soldier ―B‖ under the arms to lift him from the prone position. Soldier ―A‖ may clasp his hands in front of Soldier ―B’s‖ chest to help him lift Soldier ―B‖ to his feet.
  • Position Soldier ―B‖ over the shoulder during the carry. Secure the position with one hand, grasping Soldier ―B’s‖ forward arm.

Precautions: Keep back straight and use legs to lift Soldier to the carry position. All movement in the carry position is performed at a quick time; no running.

Summary The purpose of strength and mobility activities is to improve functional strength, postural alignment, and body mechanics as they relate to the performance of WTBDs. The regular and precise execution of the exercise drills listed in this chapter will develop the body management competencies needed to successfully accomplish these tasks.


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